Drones

Hybrid drone can fly for over three hours, or carry up to six pounds

Hybrid drone can fly for over ...
The HAMR is IP54 water-resistant, meaning it's protected against splashes of water from any direction
The HAMR is IP54 water-resistant, meaning it's protected against splashes of water from any direction
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A closer look at the HAMR's engine
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A closer look at the HAMR's engine
The HAMR has an empty weight of 32 lb (14.5 kg)
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The HAMR has an empty weight of 32 lb (14.5 kg)
The HAMR is IP54 water-resistant, meaning it's protected against splashes of water from any direction
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The HAMR is IP54 water-resistant, meaning it's protected against splashes of water from any direction
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Although electric multicopter drones have many potential applications, their 30-minute-or-less battery life limits their actual uses. The gas/electric HAMR hybrid is designed to address that limitation, offering flight times of up to 3.5 hours.

Its name an acronym for Hybrid Advanced Multi-Rotor, the HAMR is manufactured by the Virginia-based Advanced Aircraft Company.

The drone features an electronic fuel-injected computer-controlled 35cc single-piston gasoline engine, which drives an onboard generator. That generator in turn powers the craft's six independent DC electric motors, plus it charges an integrated backup battery. In the event of an engine failure, that battery will provide enough power to safely execute an emergency landing.

A closer look at the HAMR's engine
A closer look at the HAMR's engine

As mentioned, the HAMR can reportedly fly for up 3.5 hours on one 100-oz (3-l) tank of fuel, although that figure decreases as the drone's cargo payload increases. It can carry a maximum of 6 lb (2.7 kg) divided between two cargo compartments. If users wish to boost its flight time back up, one of those compartments can be used to house an optional second fuel tank.

The aircraft has an empty weight of 32 lb (14.5 kg), it's 65 inches long by 130 inches wide (1.7 by 3.3 m), and it has a maximum forward flight speed of 25 knots (29 mph or 46 km/h). According to the company, it can be unpacked from its case and in the air within four minutes, subsequently flying either by ground-based remote control or its own autopilot system.

Depending on individual users' choice of added devices (such as an HD camera), the HAMR could be utilized for applications such as surveying/mapping, military reconnaissance, scientific studies, infrastructure inspection or rural package delivery. It can be seen in action, in the video below.

HAMR Flight Demo

Source: Advanced Aircraft Company

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4 comments
4 comments
BlueOak
Yet another example of a flying device demonstrating the dramatically higher energy density of oil-based fuels vs batteries. Batteries might be making inroads, but they still have a very long way to go to match the flexibility of oil.
Nelson Hyde Chick
Oh boy, can't wait for the drone revolution on the urban environment, more noise for an already too loud environment.
michael_dowling
Another CO2 spewing gadget,just what we need when the world is broiling. From the paper: "Heat waves, droughts, flooding, wildfires threaten climate catastrophe: UN report" ‘CODE RED FOR HUMANITY’
ljaques
Well, that video did absolutely ZERO to sell anyone on the use of their drone. Their videographer would stage a F-1 race at 3mph to show off the utility and performance of the cars.