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Dyson announces bacteria-killing humidifier

Dyson announces bacteria-killi...
The new Dyson Humidifier is promised to kill 99.9 percent of bacteria
The new Dyson Humidifier is promised to kill 99.9 percent of bacteria
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The new Dyson Humidifier is promised to kill 99.9 percent of bacteria
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The new Dyson Humidifier is promised to kill 99.9 percent of bacteria
Dyson is promising that its offering will be silent, with the ability to work for 18 hours on a single tank of water
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Dyson is promising that its offering will be silent, with the ability to work for 18 hours on a single tank of water

Dyson, a company best known for its line of high-end vacuum cleaners, has just announced a new humidifier that's designed to kill bacteria in the air using what it calls "Ultraviolet Cleanse" technology.

The company points out that some ultrasonic humidifiers can actually spread bacteria through the air. Ultrasonic humidifiers create moisture though a metal diaphragm that moves at extremely high speeds. This creates water droplets, which are then dispersed through the air. If there's bacteria on said diaphragm, that will be transferred to the water, and thus blown into the room.

Dyson is promising that its offering will be silent, with the ability to work for 18 hours on a single tank of water
Dyson is promising that its offering will be silent, with the ability to work for 18 hours on a single tank of water

The solution, according to Dyson, is exposing the droplets of water to ultraviolet light, which it claims will kill 99.9 percent of the bacteria contained within the droplets. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation is not a new method of killing germs, so it makes sense to see it applied here.

Outside of the bacteria removal, Dyson's new humidifier is promised to humidify a room of up to 172 square feet (16 sq m). It also has sensors that measure temperature and humidity, thus making sure it does not make a room too moist or warm for proper comfort. As with all ultrasonic humidifiers, Dyson is promising that its offering will be silent, with the ability to work for 18 hours on a single tank of water.

The Dyston Humidifier is coming in the fall of 2015 (Northern Hemisphere), though the company did not announce an exact release date. Pricing information was also not made available at the time of this writing.

Source: Dyson

6 comments
Rehab
A billionaire vacuum cleaner salesman, I am impressed with his wealth not his over priced underachieving products. These fans have to rate way up there for absolute stupidity in design. Lets see now we will create something that is 20% as efficient as what is already out there and charge 1600% more for it. Are you not entertained?
hdm
agree with Rehab.... Dyson goes after those that feel they must spend spend spend to make a good purchase.
Constant Swagemakers
Rehab, 1600% more than what? The article states there is no pricing yet!
Mel Tisdale
We have to beware making the environment too sterile. Unless we are exposed to viruses and bacteria, we will not build up any immunity to them, with obvious results when we eventually come up against them. It used to be said that the healthiest children were those that played in the back streets in the mud and the grime. I guess I was lucky that Mr Dyson was not born before his time. And that I grew up in a time when staying indoors, playing on some electronic device or other, would have been seen as anti-social or just plain weird, especially when there was the great outdoors just begging to be enjoyed: "Here's a jam sandwich for your lunch, son. Don't come back until dinner time!"
Heather525
If this promised virus removal (which it doesn't), it might be worth it. Stick it in your sick kid's room while sleeping and the virus count would be significantly reduced in the home and the chances of passing it on to others would be reduced. However, most bacteria in the air aren't bad for you and having this running regularly in your home would certainly reduce your overall immunity to bacteria in the air outside. Many people do spread bad bacteria with existing humidifiers by running them dirty, but regular cleaning solves that problem. The design is beautiful though, I'm doubtful the price will make it worth it.
John Banister
The phrase "kill bacteria in the air" sounds inappropriate here. "Kill bacteria that might otherwise have been added to the air" sounds better. I have to wonder if there's a study comparing this to using chlorinated tap water. I also have to wonder if "ability to work for 18 hours on a single tank of water" is something one would want to advertise as a feature, considering that, for many humidifiers, moving a larger amount of water into the air in a given time period is a selling point. I still wish Dyson would use their advanced knowledge of moving air to improve the drying systems on bidet type toilet seats. The world needs the Dyson a** blade.