Motorcycles

Endeavor kit converts bikes to trikes

Endeavor kit converts bikes to...
A Honda GL1800, sporting a prototype Endeavor Trike kit
A Honda GL1800, sporting a prototype Endeavor Trike kit
View 3 Images
A Honda GL1800, sporting a prototype Endeavor Trike kit
1/3
A Honda GL1800, sporting a prototype Endeavor Trike kit
The kit incorporates a universal main frame that's mated to the user's existing motorcycle via an adapter cradle
2/3
The kit incorporates a universal main frame that's mated to the user's existing motorcycle via an adapter cradle
Everything is covered over using a series of body panels, that can be customized for a unique look
3/3
Everything is covered over using a series of body panels, that can be customized for a unique look

With the increasing popularity of vehicles such as the Can-Am Spyder and Polaris Slingshot, it looks like "reverse trike"-style motorcycles definitely have more than a few fans. We've already seen one kit that lets you convert a Harley V-Rod into such a machine. The planned Endeavor Trike kit, however, will reportedly work on just about any make or model of bike.

Created by motorcyclist Norm Kokes, the kit incorporates a universal main frame that's mated to the user's existing motorcycle via an adapter cradle. The front of that cradle is always the same, as it's the part that's attached to the standard main frame. The back, however, is made specifically to fit onto the bike in question.

Along with acting as an adapter, the cradle also houses the radiator for water-cooled motorcycles, or (in some cases) a low-speed blower for air-cooled models.

Everything is covered over using a series of body panels, that can be customized for a unique look
Everything is covered over using a series of body panels, that can be customized for a unique look

Everything is covered over using a series of body panels, that can be customized for a unique look. When the front end of the bike needs to be serviced, these can reportedly be removed in under 10 minutes, by taking out no more than 10 bolts.

In fact, if users wish to return to using their bike as a regular two-wheeler, they can still do so – installation of the kit requires no modifications to the motorcycle, so its original front wheel, etc. can just be swapped back on. Additionally, Kokes claims that the kit can be installed by the consumer in a few hours, using regular wrenches.

Norm currently has three bikes of different types, each equipped with its own prototype Endeavor kit. He's planning on taking the kit into production soon, and estimates pricing at US$8,000 to $9,000, including installation.

Source: IDO Endeavor

6 comments
Slowburn
Just buy a convertible.
Rehab
Never understood why anyone would choose this or any large touring bike when a sports car, think Miata offers so much more. I get the wind in the hair, bugs in the teeth thing, but this is not that!
panzer225MAAZ
In Australia,you can't buy a convertible,due to skin cancer laws,and a Miata,just isn't a motorcycle !!!
Mzungu_Mkubwa
@panzer, this thing just isn't a motorcycle, either... but it's way more dangerous! Keep the tilting, and you're good in my book, no matter how many wheels. ☺
Robert Flieger
If this doesn't lean it isn't a motorcycle either. I have a Miata, An MP3 500, and a Ducati. All of them are fun. The MP3 in some ways is a mix of the best attributes of the other two; with the rear trunk I put on it has enough practicality for store runs while offering a fun good handling motorcycle experience. IN MY OPINION the non-leaning trikes offer the worst of the mix. I tried a CanAm and based on what I had read I thought I was going to like it. I HATED it. I know people who have them and love them and that is great for them. If you want to go on rides with friends and health issues keep you from being able to ride a traditional bike this could be the answer.
Jon Smith
I hope the production model takes into account aesthetics as this one sure doesn't.