Energy

World's biggest clean energy project to power Singapore from Australia

World's biggest clean energy p...
The planned Australia-Asia PowerLink project is nearly 10 times the size of the world's current largest solar power installation
The planned Australia-Asia PowerLink project is nearly 10 times the size of the world's current largest solar power installation
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The Australia-Asia PowerLink project will connect Australia and Singapore with the biggest solar array and the biggest battery storage facility the world has ever seen
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The Australia-Asia PowerLink project will connect Australia and Singapore with the biggest solar array and the biggest battery storage facility the world has ever seen
The PowerLink project will roll out an extraordinary 17-20 GW of solar cells over a 12,000 hectare facility in Australia
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The PowerLink project will roll out an extraordinary 17-20 GW of solar cells over a 12,000 hectare facility in Australia
The planned Australia-Asia PowerLink project is nearly 10 times the size of the world's current largest solar power installation
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The planned Australia-Asia PowerLink project is nearly 10 times the size of the world's current largest solar power installation
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A colossal US$22-billion infrastructure project will send Australian sunshine more than 3,100 miles (5,000 km) to Singapore, via high-voltage undersea cables. Opening in 2027, it'll be the largest solar farm and battery storage facility in history.

Australia's Northern Territory has abundant space and sun; Singapore is pressed for space, and looking to transition to renewable power. The two could soon be connected in one of the largest and most ambitious renewable energy projects ever attempted.

The Australia-Asia PowerLink project, led by Australia's Sun Cable, plans to create a mammoth "Powell Creek Solar Precinct" on 12,000 hectares (29650 ac) of arid land about 800 km (500 miles) south of Darwin. The site, chosen because it's one of the most consistently sunny places on Earth, would be home to a mind-boggling 17-20 gigawatts of peak solar power generation and some 36-42 GWh of battery storage.

To give you a sense of scale, that's nearly 10 times the size of the world's current largest solar power installation, the 2.245-GW Bhadia Solar Park in India, and more than 30 times more energy storage than the last "world's biggest battery" project we covered in February. It's a bit big.

The Australia-Asia PowerLink project will connect Australia and Singapore with the biggest solar array and the biggest battery storage facility the world has ever seen
The Australia-Asia PowerLink project will connect Australia and Singapore with the biggest solar array and the biggest battery storage facility the world has ever seen

Power will travel north to the coast through overhead cables, and then it'll travel northwest to Singapore via some 4,200 km (2,600 miles) of high-voltage DC submarine cable along the sea floor, making a dog-leg through some of the fiddly islands of Indonesia. It'll supply up to 3.2 GW of dispatchable clean energy, which Sun Cable says will provide up to 15 percent of Singapore's electricity and power up to three million homes.

The environmental benefits will be significant, cutting about 11.5 million tons of CO2 emissions, which the company says is the equivalent of removing 2.5 million cars from the road.

The PowerLink project will roll out an extraordinary 17-20 GW of solar cells over a 12,000 hectare facility in Australia
The PowerLink project will roll out an extraordinary 17-20 GW of solar cells over a 12,000 hectare facility in Australia

The Australia-Asia PowerLink project has been granted Major Project status by the Australian and Northern Territory governments. The company has completed a Series A capital raise to get things going, and has completed the sub-sea survey process in the 750 km (466 miles) of the route that falls in Australian waters. Indonesia is on board, having recommended the cable route and approved a survey permit.

Environmental studies are underway, capital raising is set to close in 2023 and construction is set to begin shortly afterward. The plan is for power to start selling in Darwin by the start of 2026, and for Singapore to come online at the start of 2027.

Check out a video below.

World's largest infrastructure project - Sun Cable's AAPowerLink Project

Source: Sun Cable

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13 comments
13 comments
stormy44
Any idea how the undersea cable will stand up to earthquake activity in the area.
martinwinlow
Wow. Hopefully the first of many similar projects based in Australia and something to encourage Australians to force their governments to start moving to renewables instead of sticking with fossil fuels and Big Oil and Gas.
WeiDalong
" ... cutting about 11.5 million tons of CO2 emissions, which the company says is the equivalent of removing 2.5 million cars from the road."
Wonder how many tons of CO2 emissions will produced manufacturing all the materials needed to build such a monster. Also, considering there are about 100 millions new cars on the road every year it seems a bit of a behemoth project for so overall little impact. I`d also imagine other technologies using sun, wind, wave, gravity etc. may not be so build up intensive. Remember what happened to all the mirrors in the Nevada desert. Hope it turns out worth the effort. Lots of money spread around even if it doesn`t so it`s a bit of a win win by today`s standards; destroy the environment for economic reasons while trying to save it to sustain us.
bytheway
So, how many billionaires will this create?..........and in 10 years when the panels fall apart who will deal with the waste.....the vast solar arrays in California are already malfunctioning and the fight is on oveer who is responsible. The bs green monster is hungry and its people need to be paid...........set up safe clean nuclear power plants, now, as we know through Atlas, nearing Fusion stage.......the traditional energy needed to construct this solar project is mind boggling but i guess when the people are paying the freight and the insiders getting rich its hard to turn that horse around.
LooseSends
Between the length of the high voltage cable, intermittent sun and battery storage systems, I would guess you'd need ten times the infrastructure to provide a small fraction of the energy it collects. That's fine with no other alternatives for providing energy but don't expect it to be a net positive compared to just having nuclear on-site as far as environmental concerns once you factor in the ongoing maintenance and manpower.

Sounds like a typical make-work project for lining big-business pockets under the guise of corporate environmental virtue signaling but why let historical precedent get in the way of making middle-aged, middle-class social surfers feel warm and fuzzy inside.
kornpophunter
Why doesn't Singapore just build the new kind of safe natrium salt nuclear reactor that "Terra Power" is building in Wyoming?
I have put my money where MY mouth by having 12Kw of PV solar on my roof for over 8 years. So as much as I love solar this project seems fraught with engineering problems, logistics, and the sheer amount of solar panel required. Not saying it's a bad thing, but they should just keep the solar power in Australia. Forget the undersea cable.
Kenneth Chang
Scientists have been touting that if we can build solar panels circle around the Earth, it would solve all of our energy problems.

No energy storage required.
bwana4swahili
Great idea but a long way from supplying power. It also provides a wonderful target for terrorists!
defraggle
@WeiDalong PV Solar is different from solar thermal which uses mirrors. Solar requires manufacturing, just like everything else. Unlike everything else, they produce more energy than the it costs to make them.

Actual academic research has been done showing that the embodied carbon footprint of solar manufacture can be paid back in 1 year then free energy for another 19 years.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/259609641_Energy_payback_time_and_carbon_footprint_of_commercial_photovoltaic_systems

https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms13728

https://renew.org.au/renew-magazine/solar-batteries/energy-flows-how-green-is-my-solar/
defraggle
@kornpophunter Singapore isn't building a MSR because MSRs are uncosted vapourware products that don't exist as commerically viable energy generation in 2021
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