Bicycles

Erembald bike is laser-cut from stainless steel

Erembald bike is laser-cut fro...
The Erembald's lattice-framed design is definitely unique
The Erembald's lattice-framed design is definitely unique
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The Erembald's lattice-framed design is definitely unique
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The Erembald's lattice-framed design is definitely unique
Every Erembald is made-to-order for a specific client, with its non-adjustable seatpost and handlebar stem made to fit them
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Every Erembald is made-to-order for a specific client, with its non-adjustable seatpost and handlebar stem made to fit them
All of the tubes are likewise laser-cut to size for the individual buyer, and include interlocking bits on each end
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All of the tubes are likewise laser-cut to size for the individual buyer, and include interlocking bits on each end
In order to showcase their laser-cutting technology, the makers have cut a series of cellular-structure-inspired designs out of each tube
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In order to showcase their laser-cutting technology, the makers have cut a series of cellular-structure-inspired designs out of each tube
After four months of road testing in Belgium, six prototype Erembalds reportedly showed no signs of frame failure
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After four months of road testing in Belgium, six prototype Erembalds reportedly showed no signs of frame failure
Via their company eleventwentyseven, Tobias and Karel are now offering a limited run of 50 single-speed Erembald priced at €1,600 (about US$1,700) for a complete bike
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Via their company eleventwentyseven, Tobias and Karel are now offering a limited run of 50 single-speed Erembald priced at €1,600 (about US$1,700) for a complete bike
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The 2015 North American Handmade Bicycle Show may have just wrapped up, but that doesn't mean we're no longer hearing about interesting small-batch bikes. Belgian industrial designer Tobias Knockaert recently told us about his stainless steel Erembald bike, that he's producing along with partner Karel Vincke. In order to keep prices down, its frame is cut by lasers and put together like a puzzle.

Every Erembald is made-to-order for a specific client, with its non-adjustable seatpost and handlebar stem made to fit them – their name is also laser-etched onto the frame.

All of the tubes are likewise laser-cut to size for the individual buyer, and include interlocking bits on each end. Once all the tubes have been cut, this feature allows them to be attached to one another by hand. They're subsequently also welded together, although the interlocking feature allows the frame to be assembled for welding without the need for a jig to hold everything in place.

In order to showcase their laser-cutting technology, Knockaert and Vincke also cut a series of cellular-structure-inspired designs out of each tube. This does decrease the strength of the steel, which is why they've compensated by using thicker-than-normal tubing.

After four months of road testing in Belgium, six prototype Erembalds reportedly showed no signs of frame failure
After four months of road testing in Belgium, six prototype Erembalds reportedly showed no signs of frame failure

After four months of road testing in Belgium, six prototype Erembalds reportedly showed no signs of frame failure. Additionally, lab tests indicated that the frames were 1.5 times stiffer than a similar carbon fiber race frame. They're not particularly light, though – a complete bike weighs 12 kg (26.5 lb).

Via their company eleventwentyseven, Tobias and Karel are now offering a limited run of 50 single-speed Erembalds priced at €1,600 (about US$1,700) for a complete bike. Down the road, however, they hope to establish a cost- and production-time-effective system in which clients can enter their measurements and preferences on the company website, after which point a custom bike will automatically be laser-cut and assembled for them.

The build process is illustrated in the video below.

For another approach to economically manufacturing bespoke bicycles, check out what Circa Cycles is doing.

Source: eleventwentyseven

A DESIGN TALE

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6 comments
Keith Reeder
Side-pull brakes?
Seriously?
Milton
@keith I was wondering the same thing.
But then again, the engineer inside of me is wondering if having such a large diameter brake rotor (the wheel in this case) would out-perform a disc brake.
I'm not a big bike guy, and I know I run a disc on MTB's because the rim-brakes don't work worth a damn in the rain/mud. But I don't know how rim-brakes ("side-pull brakes) compare to discs in an ideal (not wet) environment. Care to explain?
StWils
Milton, side pull brakes are pretty much The original brake design and do work well. Center pull, in the view of many, work better and also are easier to adjust. Disk brakes work very well and keep the braking surface far from rain, mud and snow. However these guys are using stainless steel which will never have the same weight to strength ratio as lots of other materials, bamboo, fibreglass, carbon fibre, steam bent ash, etc,. While their laser cutting is an interesting idea it will never displace the well established methods that produce lighter and less expensive bikes. I wish these kids well but they will never be more than niche novelty makers.
Mark Salamon
$1700 for a 27-pound bike? No serious cyclist would buy this. It's not surprising that they're planning a limited initial production run of just 50 models, because I doubt there will be much demand for overweight, laser-cut tubing that is merely decorative and offers no beneficial advance in bike technology. I'll admit that -- for what it's worth -- this bike won't ever rust...
RodneyW123
A stainless steel bike would be really light but strong at the same time. I'd love to own one and see how it handles riding on the roads. Being so light I bet it maneuvers like a dream.
wle
well how many has it sold?