Tiny Houses

Vietnamese Forest House puts tiny living on stilts

Vietnamese Forest House puts t...
Vietnamese architect Chu Van Dong has completed a tiny house project that offers a cheap and easy solution for temporary housing or tiny house living
Vietnamese architect Chu Van Dong has completed a tiny house project that offers a cheap and easy solution for temporary housing or tiny house living
View 18 Images
Vietnamese architect Chu Van Dong has completed a tiny house project that offers a cheap and easy solution for temporary housing or tiny house living
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Vietnamese architect Chu Van Dong has completed a tiny house project that offers a cheap and easy solution for temporary housing or tiny house living
Forest House is a 12-square meter (129 sq ft) home resting on two stilts
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Forest House is a 12-square meter (129 sq ft) home resting on two stilts
Forest House is one of three projected wooden cabins located amid a vast forest landscape in the Sóc Sơn District, Vietnam
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Forest House is one of three projected wooden cabins located amid a vast forest landscape in the Sóc Sơn District, Vietnam
The cabin features a large floor-to-ceiling glass wall at the front ofthe home, capitalizing on its surrounding views and lush setting
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The cabin features a large floor-to-ceiling glass wall at the front ofthe home, capitalizing on its surrounding views and lush setting
In designing the home Van Dong wanted to create a basic building model, with an accessible and low cost construction method
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In designing the home Van Dong wanted to create a basic building model, with an accessible and low cost construction method
There is also a romantic outdoor tub, located behind the cabin amid the lush forest setting
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There is also a romantic outdoor tub, located behind the cabin amid the lush forest setting
Wooden features and simple lighting inside the Forest House
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Wooden features and simple lighting inside the Forest House
Constructed using local pine wood, the timber home is built into the side of aslope
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Constructed using local pine wood, the timber home is built into the side of aslope
The micro dwelling is suitable for two occupants and comes complete with built-in furniture
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The micro dwelling is suitable for two occupants and comes complete with built-in furniture
Forest house features in-built furniture, including a desk or dining table
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Forest house features in-built furniture, including a desk or dining table
Forest house features in-built furniture, including the sleeping quarters and bench seating
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Forest house features in-built furniture, including the sleeping quarters and bench seating
Forest house features a log fire and air conditioning for the different seasons
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Forest house features a log fire and air conditioning for the different seasons
Log fire inside the Forest House
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Log fire inside the Forest House
Forest House capitalizes on its surrounding views and lush setting
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Forest House capitalizes on its surrounding views and lush setting
Floor plans of the Forest House by Vietnamese architect Chu Van Dong
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Floor plans of the Forest House by Vietnamese architect Chu Van Dong
Cross section plans of the Forest House by Chu Van Dong
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Cross section plans of the Forest House by Chu Van Dong
Cross section plans of the Forest House by Chu Van Dong
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Cross section plans of the Forest House by Chu Van Dong
Forest House is one of three projected wooden cabins located amid a vast forest landscape in the Sóc Sơn District, Vietnam
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Forest House is one of three projected wooden cabins located amid a vast forest landscape in the Sóc Sơn District, Vietnam
View gallery - 18 images

Vietnamesearchitect ChuVan Donghas completed a tiny house project that offers a cheap and easysolution for temporary housing or tiny living. Dubbed Forest House,the 12-sq m (129-sq ft) home rests on two stilts and isone of three wooden cabins planned for a vast forestlandscape in the SócSơn District, 30.6 km (19 mi) outside of Hanoi, Vietnam.

Indesigning the home VanDong wanted to create a basic building model, with an accessible andlow cost construction method."Itis hoped that the project will inspire temporary housing projects byits simple construction and low cost,"says Van Dong, who is also a designer at Handyman decor and furniture.

The cabin features a large floor-to-ceiling glass wall at the front ofthe home, capitalizing on its surrounding views and lush setting
The cabin features a large floor-to-ceiling glass wall at the front ofthe home, capitalizing on its surrounding views and lush setting

"Designedas a small wooden box lying on the sloping hill, each house has asolid structure," says Handyman. "The interior is arrangedreasonably, compact and full of facilities, including glass windowsthroughout the home, which look straight out over the woods. It'sextremely poetic."

Constructedusing local pine wood, the timber home is built into the side of aslope and is supported by two steel pillars positioned at the frontof the dwelling. Boasting a simple design, the cabin features a largefloor-to-ceiling glass wall at the front of the home, capitalizing onits surrounding views and lush setting.

Constructed using local pine wood, the timber home is built into the side of aslope
Constructed using local pine wood, the timber home is built into the side of aslope

Themicro dwelling is suitable for two occupants and comes complete within-built furniture, including the sleeping quarters and desk, livingzone, log fire, air conditioning, separate toilet and basin. There isalso a romantic outdoor tub located behind the cabin amid the forest setting.

There is also a romantic outdoor tub, located behind the cabin amid the lush forest setting
There is also a romantic outdoor tub, located behind the cabin amid the lush forest setting

Constructed on a US$3,000 final budget, the Forest Home is a great example for tiny livingpossibilities and with a few additional amendments, such as solarroof panels, an elevated loft bed, mini kitchen and external watertank, this temporary home could easily be transformed into apermanent tiny residence.

Source: Handyman, Chu Van Dong via Archdaily

View gallery - 18 images
2 comments
CAVUMark
I'm not convinced a fireplace is needed in Vietnam. Yes on the AC!
Eric Blenheim
What if termites eat the stilts?