Architecture

Freedom Yurt-Cabins: A modern take on the nomadic shelter

Freedom Yurt-Cabins: A modern ...
Freedom Yurt-Cabins are delivered in kit form, and the firm states they can be assembled by a couple of people in a weekend
Freedom Yurt-Cabins are delivered in kit form, and the firm states they can be assembled by a couple of people in a weekend
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Aurora, Colorado-based Freedom Yurt-Cabins offers an updated take on the original small living movement
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Aurora, Colorado-based Freedom Yurt-Cabins offers an updated take on the original small living movement
The firm's eponymous shelter is based on a yurt, but adds some modern innovations
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The firm's eponymous shelter is based on a yurt, but adds some modern innovations
Freedom Yurt-Cabins boast low-energy windows, a wooden ceiling, a proper front door, and modern insulation
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Freedom Yurt-Cabins boast low-energy windows, a wooden ceiling, a proper front door, and modern insulation
The wooden ceiling
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The wooden ceiling
The walls comprise SIPs (structural insulated panels) and fiberglass insulation
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The walls comprise SIPs (structural insulated panels) and fiberglass insulation
The yurts come in a variety of colors
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The yurts come in a variety of colors
Freedom Yurt-Cabins can be used as an additional bedroom or workspace, for events or as a tiny house/cabin
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Freedom Yurt-Cabins can be used as an additional bedroom or workspace, for events or as a tiny house/cabin
Inside a Freedom Yurt-Cabin
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Inside a Freedom Yurt-Cabin
Inside a Freedom Yurt-Cabin
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Inside a Freedom Yurt-Cabin
The 217 sq ft (20 sq m) 12-wall model will set you back $11,995, while the 14-wall 296 sq ft (27 sq m) and 16-wall (35 sq m) units fetch $13,995, and $15,995, respectively
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The 217 sq ft (20 sq m) 12-wall model will set you back $11,995, while the 14-wall 296 sq ft (27 sq m) and 16-wall (35 sq m) units fetch $13,995, and $15,995, respectively
Freedom Yurt-Cabins are delivered in kit form, and the firm states they can be assembled by a couple of people in a weekend
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Freedom Yurt-Cabins are delivered in kit form, and the firm states they can be assembled by a couple of people in a weekend
Other notable features of the Freedom Yurt-Cabins include Low-E (energy-efficient) windows, a wooden ceiling with a roof crown topping the structure, and an insulated steel door
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Other notable features of the Freedom Yurt-Cabins include Low-E (energy-efficient) windows, a wooden ceiling with a roof crown topping the structure, and an insulated steel door
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Good ideas tend to stand the test of time and the yurt is no exception, hence the number of modern options on the market. Aurora, Colorado-based Freedom Yurt-Cabins offers its own updated take on the nomadic dwelling, with improvements including energy-efficient windows, a proper front door, and modern insulation. It's available in a number of sizes, with the smallest 217 sq ft (20 sq m) model starting at just under US$12,000.

Freedom Yurt-Cabins comprise a roundwood frame made from Lodgepole pine, and an integrated floor. The walls feature SIPs (structural insulated panels) and fiberglass insulation, offering an R-value (a measure of thermal resistance) of R-9.7. The ceiling, meanwhile, consists of Polyisocyanurate (PIR) rigid foam insulation board, which is rated at R-13.7. The interior features an attractive wooden ceiling which is supported by a lightweight steel roof ring. This is topped by a DuraLast heavy duty vinyl roof and clear acrylic roof dome.

Concrete foundations aren't required, so it can be moved with relative ease – though perhaps not as easily as the Jero – and depending on what size model you go for, it sports two or three Low-E (low thermal emissivity) windows as standard (additional windows can be added at cost). Access is gained by a single insulated steel door.

Inside a Freedom Yurt-Cabin
Inside a Freedom Yurt-Cabin

Freedom Yurt-Cabins can serve as an additional bedroom or workspace, for hosting events, or as a tiny house or cabin. On this note, the firm told us that while it delivers the yurt empty, buyers can have a chat with its in-house designer to help come up with an interior plan which can then be taken to a contractor to realize. The company will also be offering pre-fabricated interior accessories later this year.

The structures are delivered in kit form, and the firm states that it should take a couple of people a weekend to assemble. The 217 sq ft (20 sq m) 12-wall model will set you back $11,995, while the 14-wall 296 sq ft (27 sq m) and 16-wall (35 sq m) units fetch $13,995, and $15,995, respectively.

Source: Freedom Yurt-Cabins

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5 comments
Don Duncan
The insulation is pathetic. And it's important to get it right. Foil-backed PIR should have been used throughout, maybe with choice of R-value if it's too expensive, but I doubt it. I would chose R-30 walls, R-60 roof.
Side windows should be optional. The skylight should allow a complete block of light. No mention of plumbing? Why? Surely that's included along with wiring and the enclosure. Otherwise it's not a cabin, just a room.
JoshBarry
Don,
We at Freedom Yurt Cabins sell an engineered shell structure for less than $20,000. Obviously the insulation is not comparable to a modern home with a much more hefty price tag. Also, our Yurt Cabin can be assembled and disassembled as many times as needed because of the integration of our insulation into the modular structure. FYI, we do use PIR in our roof, and 2" of foil backed PIR provides the R-13.7 number provided. We offer an option for a 3" PIR roof which would be R-20, and will soon offer a 2" PIR option for our walls. The light from the dome can certainly be blocked completely with a small fixture, and electrical integration into a Yurt Cabin is accomplished with similar ease.
You are comparing our structure's features with those of a far more costly tiny house or cabin. The reality is that most of these features can easily be installed in a Yurt Cabin to make an affordable residence which is engineered from top to bottom.
Tom Lee Mullins
I think that is really neat. I can see the points made by the first poster/commenter.
Perhaps it could be a retreat, a guest room or perhaps a study. It has - IMO - much potential.
ljaques
Sixteen grand for a tent? Riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiight. But it's not even a yurt/tent. And for that price, why not put in real walls/ceiling/flooring with decent R values, huh? Plumbing, wiring, windows are nice, too. How can we have gotten so far removed from the $2,000 SIP cabin (or LaMar's 400s/f $2k cabin), with nothing to show for the misdirection?
juandegringo
Re: JoshBarry's comment on a complete light block option. We live in a house called the Live/Work home. You can find plenty of references on the web. This house has 10 (cheapo) light tubes w/o light blocks. Also for LEED points, it has no AC. During the summer those 10 light tubes are magnificent heaters, each generating heat at ambient, outdoor temperatures, e.g. 95F. Thus, we have to cover at least 7 of the 10 with aluminum foil each summer and remove the aluminum in the Fall, not an easy trip for a fat, old, unemployed, white boy retiree of 69. Suggestion: listen to JoshBarry and include the light blocks. I speak from experience.
Also, may I suggest you look at the paint with NASA-developed, insulating ceramic spheres, now applied to plain old non-insulating paint that they claim kept the heat shield of the space shuttle from burning up. www.hy-tech.com. Might help with the insulation issues JoshBarry pointed out. I used the white membrane paint on the roof and the aluminum reflective paint for concrete in the basement with very measurable and satisfactory results. Use it inside and out, up and down. Reasonably priced, in my opinion.