Good Thinking

G-RO carry-on bag is built for turbulent terrain

G-RO carry-on bag is built for...
The G-RO is described as a "companion bag," as it is designed not only for lugging about, but for using and spending time with while you travel
The G-RO is described as a "companion bag," as it is designed not only for lugging about, but for using and spending time with while you travel
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The G-RO is described as a "companion bag," as it is designed not only for lugging about, but for using and spending time with while you travel
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The G-RO is described as a "companion bag," as it is designed not only for lugging about, but for using and spending time with while you travel
The large wheels of the G-RO make it easier to pull on different terrains
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The large wheels of the G-RO make it easier to pull on different terrains
The G-RO has an aircraft-grade aluminum handle, which is said to extend 6 inches (152 mm) farther than the industry standard
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The G-RO has an aircraft-grade aluminum handle, which is said to extend 6 inches (152 mm) farther than the industry standard
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Wheeled carry-on cases are great until you try to pull them over a rough surface. The tiny wheels make them awkward to pull, and can break. The G-RO bag, however, has large wheels to handle different types of terrain and a host of other features aimed at improving the time you spend travelling.

G-RO describes its case as a "companion bag." This is because, like the recently-announced Jurni ride-on case, it is designed not only for lugging about, but for using and spending time with while you travel.

To begin, the G-RO has a variety of compartments for different uses. There's an interior compartment for accommodating personal items, a compartment for work items, an easy-access pocket for carry-on liquids, and a personal pocket for essentials. All this makes it easier for users to know what items are where, and to access them easily when in transit.

Other features for when you're hanging around airports include a built-in tablet stand and a charging station with two USB ports, the latter of which will only be of use if the user purchases the optional electronic module. This incorporates a 23,000-mAh battery for device charging, a universal power outlet, a location tracker and a wireless proximity detector.

The G-RO has an aircraft-grade aluminum handle, which is said to extend 6 inches (152 mm) farther than the industry standard
The G-RO has an aircraft-grade aluminum handle, which is said to extend 6 inches (152 mm) farther than the industry standard

The bag measures 22 x 14 x 9 in (56 x 36 x 23 cm), which G-RO says is compliant with current TSA, FAA, airline and international carry-on size regulations – although the company claims that it is slightly lighter than the industry average carry-on bag. It also boasts a built-in TSA-approved lock.

The GR-O weighs in at just 3.6 kg (7.9 lb), although the large size of the wheels means that they support the load of the bag closer to its center of gravity, making it feel lighter still. The wheels are also reportedly more durable than conventional carry-on-type wheels, and have an axle-less design that helps to maximize internal storage space.

Among the other features of the G-RO is an aircraft-grade aluminum handle, which the company says extends 6 inches (152 mm) farther than the industry standard and has stops at different levels to accommodate people of different heights. This, ultimately, makes the bag easier to pull along.

Materials used for the construction of the G-RO include ballistic nylon, plus aerospace and firearm-grade polymers. Nylon zippers with a "roller coaster" design are used to distribute stress, while a waterproof base and arched belly help the bag to stay dry and minimize scrapes.

A Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign for the G-RO is ongoing. At the time of writing, individuals who pledge from US$279 can receive a G-RO case, assuming all goes to plan with the campaign and roll-out. Delivery is expected from August next year.

The video below provides an introduction to the G-RO.

Sources: Kickstarter, G-RO

Meet G-RO

View gallery - 3 images
5 comments
Bob Flint
First it's already much too heavy as an empty bag. Second, how can terrain be "turbulent"? The wheels will dig into sand, and in no time damage or render the hub less design inoperable, so unless it was intended to glide on it's belly, then the skinny wheels fail. Besides the fact that once you arrive at your destination, or coming back home, the dirt from those wheels will create a mess on the surface you place this down on to un-pack.
Good luck with lugging that massive 23,000-mAh battery pack around and getting through security with it. How much space is left for storage after spending that amount of money?
Marco Corona
I like being able to have my 4 wheel bag freely being rolled along on all 4 wheels in the upright position. Doesn't look like that's possible at all with G-RO.
agulesin
"built-in TSA-approved lock" - does that mean "The Authorities" can open it on the way through the system?
Peter Kelly
There is nothing, NOTHING, worse in an airport than these stupid cases with wheels!
Every escalator, or moving pavement, leads to people stopping just before mounting and after dismounting to operate the handles, leading to those behind having to wait at the most inopportune moment, or worse, being pushed into the back of now stationary people.
Cases with wheels should be banned!
kriskret
Another nerd's linguistic development ?!!!! - " Turbulent " may only be used in co-relation to air or fluid condition.
Webster definition : Full Definition of turbulence : the quality or state of being turbulent: as a : great commotion or agitation b : irregular atmospheric motion especially when characterized by up-and-down currents c : departure in a fluid from a smooth flow ----- ------ ------ ------- ----- ------ ------- ------ ------ ------ ------ ------- Chaotic or unstable eddying motion in a fluid. Avoiding excessive turbulence generated around moving objects (such as airplanes), which can make their motion inefficient and difficult to control, is a major factor in aerodynamic design. The American Heritage® Science Dictionary.