Electronics

US surgeon streams operation via Google Glass

US surgeon streams operation v...
Performing surgery while wearing Google Glass could offer advantages for doctors and patients (Photo: Ohio State University)
Performing surgery while wearing Google Glass could offer advantages for doctors and patients (Photo: Ohio State University)
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Wearing glass in the operating table could be a way to obtain relevant data from the patient's history, and to consult colleagues in real time (Photo: Ohio State University)
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Wearing glass in the operating table could be a way to obtain relevant data from the patient's history, and to consult colleagues in real time (Photo: Ohio State University)
Dr. Christopher Kaeding prepares to perform surgery wearing Google Glass (Photo: Ohio State University)
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Dr. Christopher Kaeding prepares to perform surgery wearing Google Glass (Photo: Ohio State University)
Dr. Christopher Kaeding prepares to perform surgery wearing Google Glass (Photo: Ohio State University)
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Dr. Christopher Kaeding prepares to perform surgery wearing Google Glass (Photo: Ohio State University)
Medical students were able to watch the surgery in real time (Photo: Ohio State University)
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Medical students were able to watch the surgery in real time (Photo: Ohio State University)
Medical students were able to watch the surgery in real time (Photo: Ohio State University)
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Medical students were able to watch the surgery in real time (Photo: Ohio State University)
Performing surgery while wearing Google Glass could offer advantages for doctors and patients (Photo: Ohio State University)
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Performing surgery while wearing Google Glass could offer advantages for doctors and patients (Photo: Ohio State University)

A surgeon at The Ohio State University recently performed a routine knee surgery wearing Google Glass. Streaming live video footage from the operating room, the demonstration showcased some of the ways in which Glass could be useful in the operating room.

After Dr. Ismail Nabeel managed to obtain one of the few Glass test units, he decided to partner with colleague Dr. Christopher Kaeding to demonstrate how wearable computing devices such as Google's highly anticipated device could change the way operations are performed.

Kaeding performed a routine knee ligament surgery while wearing Glass, which enabled him to stream live video to colleagues, who consulted with them, and to a group of medical students at Ohio State, who watched the surgery on their laptops as it unfolded in real time.

Medical students were able to watch the surgery in real time (Photo: Ohio State University)
Medical students were able to watch the surgery in real time (Photo: Ohio State University)

Wearable computing devices such as Glass have aroused the interest of the medical community because they could have interesting implications in several aspects of patient care.

Aside from enhancing medical education, Google Glass could be used to spread time-critical medical expertise in areas that are hard to reach. Inside the operating room, it could even allow surgeons to call up X-rays or MRI images of their patients in real time, or consult with the relevant specialist remotely and in real time.

The video below shows Google Glass at work and discusses some of its possible medical applications.

Source: The Ohio State University

Point-of-view surgery is shown via Google Glass

2 comments
christopher
Oh the Irony - Google's Android makes shutter sounds when you take photos (even in silent mode), because silent photos invade privacy. Then they peddle possibly the worlds most evil privacy-invading tech. Best use I can think of for surgery, is for litigating against the doctor afterwards - you only need to capture a few seconds of "oops" to convince a jury to end his career, and earn millions in damages.
Joel Detrow
Litigating against the doctor? Get this, Christopher - human beings make mistakes! The point to distinguish is if they messed up something they really should know, or if it was a simple mistake. Most of the time, it's a simple mistake. Doctors are always learning things that weren't taught in universities, but this technology could nip even that in the bud!