Mobile Technology

Hands-on with Kodak's first Android phone

Photos are a focus of Kodak's phone (Photo: Eric Mack/Gizmag.com)
Photos are a focus of Kodak's phone (Photo: Eric Mack/Gizmag.com)
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The IM5 features oversized icons (Photo: Eric Mack/Gizmag.com)
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The IM5 features oversized icons (Photo: Eric Mack/Gizmag.com)
Kodak hopes it will sell many people its first smartphone (Photo: Eric Mack/Gizmag.com)
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Kodak hopes it will sell many people its first smartphone (Photo: Eric Mack/Gizmag.com)
The home screen (Photo: Eric Mack/Gizmag.com)
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The home screen (Photo: Eric Mack/Gizmag.com)
Photos are a focus of Kodak's phone (Photo: Eric Mack/Gizmag.com)
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Photos are a focus of Kodak's phone (Photo: Eric Mack/Gizmag.com)
The IM5 has a 13 megapixel camera (Photo: Eric Mack/Gizmag.com)
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The IM5 has a 13 megapixel camera (Photo: Eric Mack/Gizmag.com)

Kodak revolutionized and modernized photography, but the company has no such ambitions with its first branded smartphone. Instead, it's banking that its name and history will convince seniors to take a brave jump into the touchscreen world.

Gizmag had a chance to go hands-on and learn about Kodak's anticipated Android phone at CES 2015, where we learned that our readers probably won't own one, but they might set one up for those who do.

The Kodak IM5 is actually made by the Bullitt Group, which also makes the rugged CAT phone. But rather than being rugged, Kodak's phone is meant to ease the transition between flip phones and that first real smartphone.

The Android phone uses oversized icons and a simplified home screen with quick link buttons for a dedicated app store, messaging, calls, photos, camera, web, email, printing, a flashlight and a magnifier function. The camera app also allows for simple edits and a button to print a photo with a single tap.

The home screen (Photo: Eric Mack/Gizmag.com)
The home screen (Photo: Eric Mack/Gizmag.com)

Most uniquely, the IM5 also comes with remote management software that allows a tech-savvy friend or relative of the owner to provide help and troubleshooting from any PC or tablet. It's a little like the instant help feature on Amazon's Fire devices, but rather than a call center worker, the call for help goes to a pre-selected helper (lucky you?).

The IM5 is a dual SIM device with a 5-inch 1280 x 720 LCD IPS display, a 13 megapixel camera and a 5 MP selfie shooter. It runs Android KitKat on a 1.8 GHz MediaTek octa-core processor and 1 GB of RAM. Notably, it's lacking an LTE radio, but it's targeted for launch in Europe initially soon, with a global release via eCommerce sites in the second quarter of this year.

Kodak's first Android will sell for €229 in Europe and eventually for US $249 online. That's around £185 or AU$335.

3 comments
Kevin Ritchey
They finally made a phone even my mom could use but just a few years too late. She's 85 now and nearly blind from Parkinson's. But I'm real happy for the other folks who will now have a chance at using something simple with help just a touch away (are you listening Microsoft?). Hope it catches on like "fire." I bet my mom could probably still use it if it is as versatile as they say it is. How about we find out? If it passes the MOM test, it's a winner.
pmshah
What is so "Hands On" about this article ? Nothing more than what one might pick up from sales leaflet ! One thing is for sure. As a lab owner, I was associated with Kodak photography products for nearly 30 years and trust them blindly. Even now I stick with their "progressive lenses" for my spectacles.
Ranscapture
Good for Kodak, now make cameras again.
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