Architecture

The Wave breaks on the shore of a Danish fjord

Construction on The Wave was delayed because of the 2008 financial crisis but after 11 years the project is finally complete
Construction on The Wave was delayed because of the 2008 financial crisis but after 11 years the project is finally complete
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Construction on The Wave was delayed because of the 2008 financial crisis but after 11 years the project is finally complete
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Construction on The Wave was delayed because of the 2008 financial crisis but after 11 years the project is finally complete
The Wave consists of five distinct parts 
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The Wave consists of five distinct parts 
Some of The Wave's apartments include their own balconies
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Some of The Wave's apartments include their own balconies
The Wave's design is inspired by surrounding hills
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The Wave's design is inspired by surrounding hills
"The land surrounding Vejle is unique for its rolling hills, which are an uncommon sight in Denmark," explains Søren Øllgaard, Partner and Design Director at Henning Larsen
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"The land surrounding Vejle is unique for its rolling hills, which are an uncommon sight in Denmark," explains Søren Øllgaard, Partner and Design Director at Henning Larsen
Work on The Wave began back in 2007
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Work on The Wave began back in 2007
Each wave hosts 20 apartments
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Each wave hosts 20 apartments
The sculpted wave-like structures that house the apartments have skylights installed to maximize light inside
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The sculpted wave-like structures that house the apartments have skylights installed to maximize light inside

Henning Larsen Architects recently made our end of year best buildings list for its unusual Eysturkommuna Town Hall and its newly-completed project, The Wave, once again shows the firm's flair for producing interesting designs. The residential building has an undulating form that's divided into five sections.

The Wave is installed on the edge of a fjord in Vejle, Denmark, and has a total floorspace of 14,000 sq m (roughly 150,694 sq ft). Each of the five waves hosts 20 apartments, with a floorspace between 97 - 198 sq m (1,000 - 2,130 sq ft), plus a penthouse that has a floorspace of 255 sq m (2,744 sq ft) over two floors. The apartments are fronted by glazing and skylights are also installed to maximize light inside. Some of the apartments boast their own balconies, too.

Its undulating design was informed by the surrounding hills, which are noteworthy in the relatively flat Denmark, as well as the lapping of the fjord's water.

The sculpted wave-like structures that house the apartments have skylights installed to maximize light inside
The sculpted wave-like structures that house the apartments have skylights installed to maximize light inside

"There is only one place in the world where this building can be, and that is at the harbor front in Vejle," says Søren Øllgaard, Partner and Design Director at Henning Larsen. "The building works here because it interplays with the surrounding hills, the architecture of the bridge and the lapping of Vejle Fjord."

The Wave's graceful appearance belies a somewhat troubled construction process. The first two sections were completed some time ago, but the project was then postponed due to the financial crisis in 2008 and remained incomplete. Now, 11 years after ground was first broken on The Wave, it's finally finished.

Sources: Henning Larsen Architects, Bølgen (in Danish)

2 comments
guzmanchinky
THAT is a cool looking building! But I've been to Denmark, and it's cold and rainy almost all. the. time...
VincentWolf
Beautiful form follows nature so well. I hope the architect gets full credit.