Marine

High-tech watercraft transforms from monohull, to catamaran, to trimaran, to hydrofoil

High-tech watercraft transform...
Monohull, catamaran, trimaran and hydrofoil become one
Monohull, catamaran, trimaran and hydrofoil become one
View 20 Images
The Kormaran is a shape-shifting boat that provides the benefits of several different vessels
1/20
The Kormaran is a shape-shifting boat that provides the benefits of several different vessels
The latest Kormaran prototype launched in June
2/20
The latest Kormaran prototype launched in June
The Kormaran offers four styles of boats in one
3/20
The Kormaran offers four styles of boats in one
The nose of the central hull folds into a deck when occupants want to anchor for a swim
4/20
The nose of the central hull folds into a deck when occupants want to anchor for a swim
Kormaran's branding won a 2013 Red Dot Award
5/20
Kormaran's branding won a 2013 Red Dot Award
The Kormoran will appear at the upcoming Monaco Yacht Show
6/20
The Kormoran will appear at the upcoming Monaco Yacht Show
Kormaran's shape shifting is made possible by its hydraulic arms
7/20
Kormaran's shape shifting is made possible by its hydraulic arms
Kormaran uses carbon fiber in its construction
8/20
Kormaran uses carbon fiber in its construction
Kormaran close-up
9/20
Kormaran close-up
The interior is trimmed in leather
10/20
The interior is trimmed in leather
Carbon fiber blends with teak wood
11/20
Carbon fiber blends with teak wood
The surfaces of the outrigger hulls and decks are made from teak
12/20
The surfaces of the outrigger hulls and decks are made from teak
Black joints accentuate the look of the teak decking
13/20
Black joints accentuate the look of the teak decking
The hydraulic arms are electronically controlled and work when stopped or in motion
14/20
The hydraulic arms are electronically controlled and work when stopped or in motion
Two hydrofoils let the Kormaran speed above the water's surface
15/20
Two hydrofoils let the Kormaran speed above the water's surface
Anchor the Kormaran and transform it into a floating deck
16/20
Anchor the Kormaran and transform it into a floating deck
The fold-out hydrofoils allow the Kormaran to ride above the surface of the water
17/20
The fold-out hydrofoils allow the Kormaran to ride above the surface of the water
Monohull, catamaran, trimaran and hydrofoil become one
18/20
Monohull, catamaran, trimaran and hydrofoil become one
Sit in the driver's seat
19/20
Sit in the driver's seat
A new, versatile boat is born
20/20
A new, versatile boat is born

The Kormoran from the Austrian company of the same name can speed on (and above) the water as a catamaran, trimaran, monohull and hydrofoil, making it one of the most versatile vessels to ever hit the high seas. A pair of hydraulically actuated hulls allows it to transform before your eyes, even while in motion.

The Kormaran is a high-tech piece of innovation that lets boaters enjoy the benefits of different types of boats without investing in a small marina of individual models. The key to its multifunctional design is in the kinetic outrigger hulls that quickly change its shape and character.

When drawn completely inward via the electronically activated hydraulic arms, the outrigger hulls fold into the fuselage-like central hull to create a monohull. When deployed partially, they become the dual hulls of a catamaran, with the body set above the water. Deploy them completely, and the body drops to the water's surface becoming the third hull of what is now a trimaran.

The Kormaran also has a set of fold-out hydrofoils. When it's in monohull mode, these hydrofoils can be deployed, pushing the body up above the water. This configuration cuts water resistance by up to 80 percent, allowing for a fast, smooth ride that eats less fuel.

The fold-out hydrofoils allow the Kormaran to ride above the surface of the water
The fold-out hydrofoils allow the Kormaran to ride above the surface of the water

With the power from its 493-hp triple jet drive, the Kormaran can hits speeds up to 44 mph (70 km/h) and travel up to 108 nmi (200 km) at that top speed. It measures 7 m (23 ft) in length and between 5 and 11.5 ft (1.5 and 3.5 m) in width, from monohull to trimaran configurations. It appears to be configured for two (cozy) rear passengers behind the single driver. A set of rear-hinged wing doors provide ingress.

In addition to its four drive configurations, the Kormaran can serve as a swimming platform when anchored. The nose of the body transforms into a flat teak deck via two fold-out sections. That combines with the fold-out teak panels that fill the space between the outer hulls and central hull, providing ample space for occupants to sunbathe and dive into the water.

Kormaran complements its innovative design with high-end materials. The boat's main structure is crafted from carbon fiber, one of the elements the company has borrowed from the F1 racing world. The hydraulic arms are a combination of stainless steel and titanium, while the interior is trimmed in leather. The hull and deck surfaces use a black-jointed teak. A lighting system provides for night navigation.

The Kormaran prototype made its world debut in June and will be appearing at the Monaco Yacht Show later this month. The company's materials don't list a production date or estimated pricing, but we assume it didn't invest a reported €10,000,000 (US $13M) without planning to hawk a couple of these to wealthy yacht owners.

To watch the Kormaran transform, check out the 3D section of its website.

Source: Kormaran via Super Yacht Times

15 comments
Rehab
44 mph, are we missing something here? Imagine designing a super car that tops out at 90 mph, Kormoran we have a problem!
Chevypower
All that power and innovation and it's slower than a jet ski? Am I missing something here? Other than that, that looks awesome!
liui
A stinky name for such a beautiful vessel
BigGoofyGuy
I think that is really neat. Perhaps James Bond newest vehicle? Having it transform sounds like something Q would come up with.
srn
very good renderings, but how to get propulsion on hydrofoils ?
equator180
Looks great...but thats it, performance is not there. Looking at the presentation links, there appears to be a water jet in each of the two outriggers and one in the monohull...what is powering the outrigger jets? Also look at the hydro set up, If this craft is hydroplaning, where is the power coming from...a few holes in either the description or the presentation...which?
Dirk Scott
Lose those deadly sticky-up doors guys! They're always there on the prototype cars but they soon go when production looms. All the things this beastie does are out there already. The difference is in putting them together in one package. That probably explains the low speed: too much tech crammed into a tiny craft, like one of those fat multi-tools with too many attachments. It also means no patent protection. That leaves the super rich market, but they can afford to have separate (really fast) speed boats and bathing platforms etc. and don't care about economy. Basically there is no market niche for the product.
Lewis M. Dickens III
Amazing how lifelike renderings have gotten now. Would be great to know the platform used. Bill
Daryl West
I came up with a design just like this, several years ago now. The difference being was that my design was much larger and the concept was a motor sailing yacht. I do not see the point in having 'variable geometry' applied to small vessels. A large yacht, that can increase its width for stability and space makes more sense. As for the speed, although it is a might slower than many hydro-jet powered vessels, 44mph maintained over 100Nm, is pretty reasonable, IF the sea state allows. I too noted that there was a lack of information regarding the propulsion whilst in 'Hydrofoil Mode'. And yes, 'Q' would be proud! Though he'd probably get around the hydrofoil propulsion issue with judicious use of a mini gas turbine! All said and done, if it saves on fuel, then it has to be acceptable, performance wise, it doesn't need to be an offshore power boat and jet ski's should be banned anyway....
Jim Sadler
It is a design exercise for which I see no real world need. I suppose it is good to show your friends that you can waste money.