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Optoma focuses on smooth gaming action for latest UHD projectors

Optoma focuses on smooth gamin...
The UHD38 and UHD35 projectors boast input lag of 4.2 milliseconds and a refresh rate of 240 Hz for 1080p gaming
The UHD38 and UHD35 projectors boast input lag of 4.2 milliseconds and a refresh rate of 240 Hz for 1080p gaming
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The gaming-focused DLP projectors feature two HDMI inputs, as well as VGA, and both analog and digital audio outputs
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The gaming-focused DLP projectors feature two HDMI inputs, as well as VGA, and both analog and digital audio outputs
There's a Wall Color mode where the thrown image can be adjusted depending on the color of the wall, though you will need a screen if your wall is natural brick
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There's a Wall Color mode where the thrown image can be adjusted depending on the color of the wall, though you will need a screen if your wall is natural brick
The UHD38 4K UHD projector outputs up to 4,000 lumens
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The UHD38 4K UHD projector outputs up to 4,000 lumens
The UHD35 4K UHD projector outputs up to 3,600 lumens
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The UHD35 4K UHD projector outputs up to 3,600 lumens
The UHD38 and UHD35 projectors boast input lag of 4.2 milliseconds and a refresh rate of 240 Hz for 1080p gaming
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The UHD38 and UHD35 projectors boast input lag of 4.2 milliseconds and a refresh rate of 240 Hz for 1080p gaming
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Taiwanese audiovisual gear marker Optoma launched a 4K DLP projector in March of last year that didn't just throw at over 300 inches, but also boasted a 240-Hz refresh rate at Full HD for blur-free big-screen gaming. Now two more projectors aimed at living room gamers have joined the UHD50X.

The only appreciable difference between the UHD38 and UHD35 models is the brightness – the former puts out up to 4,000 lumens, while the latter manages 3,600.

Each model features dual HDMI inputs for cabling up to a games console, set-top box, laptop, Blu-ray player and so on. And there's an enhanced gaming mode that's said to get input lag down to just 4.2 milliseconds for 1080p gaming, while boasting a maximum refresh rate of 240 Hz. Thrown image size can get up to 300 diagonal inches.

The projectors can also be used to watch movies and shows at up to 4K UHD (3,840 x 2,160), and are capable of receiving and displaying HDR10 and Hybrid Log Gamma high definition content for a more lifelike viewing experience. There's support for the Rec.709 color gamut too, and for movie content shot at 24 frames per second for cinema-like viewing "exactly as the director intended." Deep blacks shouldn't be a problem either thanks to the 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio.

There's a Wall Color mode where the thrown image can be adjusted depending on the color of the wall, though you will need a screen if your wall is natural brick
There's a Wall Color mode where the thrown image can be adjusted depending on the color of the wall, though you will need a screen if your wall is natural brick

There's no need to redecorate in projector-friendly white when you buy either of these new models, as the Wall Color setting adjusts the thrown image based on the color of the wall – which can compensate for six different background colors, including yellow, pink and light green.

Elsewhere, the units feature manual zoom and keystone correction, each rocks a 10-W integrated speaker – but there are also analog and digital audio outputs for connecting to bigger and better audio systems – and there's a USB Type A port for plugging in a Chromecast, Roku or other smart entertainment dongles. The lamp light source is good for between 4,000 hours in full brightness and 10,000 hours in eco mode.

The UHD38 gaming projector is available in the UK now for £1,099, while the UHD35 comes in at £999 (that's about US$1,500 and $1,360 respectively, though there's no word at the moment on a US release). Each unit comes with a backlit remote.

Product pages: UHD38, UHD35

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