Motorcycles

That was quick: Honda officially launches the new CBR250RR lightweight supersports bike

That was quick: Honda official...
Honda's 2017 CBR250RR: a tiny 250cc supersport bike focused on light weight and compact dimensions as well as high performance
Honda's 2017 CBR250RR: a tiny 250cc supersport bike focused on light weight and compact dimensions as well as high performance
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Honda's new CBR250RR: a brand new design focused on light weight, compact dimensions and high performance
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Honda's new CBR250RR: a brand new design focused on light weight, compact dimensions and high performance
Honda's 2017 CBR250RR: a tiny 250cc supersport bike focused on light weight and compact dimensions as well as high performance
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Honda's 2017 CBR250RR: a tiny 250cc supersport bike focused on light weight and compact dimensions as well as high performance

Turns out we didn't have to wait long after last week's teaser; Honda has officially released photos and details about its new lightweight sportsbike, the CBR250RR. With an all-new high performance parallel twin engine, fly-by-wire throttle control and pretty mean looks, the new RR is set to launch in Indonesia this year, and there's certainly plans to ship it elsewhere as well.

The Arr Arr Pirate Bike is back, and it looks like a hoot. Honda is set to reinvigorate the tiny sportsbike market with a brand new 250 that's arguably more badass to look at than the flagship CBR1000RR Fireblade.

The new bike's eye-catching styling is sharp and angular, with a nice-looking frame and a double-barrel exhaust that's about the best looking standard pipe I can remember seeing on a Honda.

Slated for manufacturing in Indonesia, the new bike has been designed from scratch with light weight, compact dimensions and high performance in mind.

Honda's new CBR250RR: a brand new design focused on light weight, compact dimensions and high performance
Honda's new CBR250RR: a brand new design focused on light weight, compact dimensions and high performance

Thus a freshly designed parallel twin engine, which Honda says it's managed to engineer into the width of a typical 250 cc single cylinder engine. The team has taken a bunch of measures to keep things compact, hiding primary gears inside the cam chain, pulling the water and oil pumps into the design as integrated parts, and placing the engine breather chamber in behind the cylinder.

That engine is operated by the first fly-by-wire throttle in the 250 cc class, which gives the RR a set of selectable riding modes. I'm not sure why you'd need to tame the brutal power of a quarter-liter engine with a softer throttle map, but … you can.

Suspension in not by Öhlins, as previous reports suggested – instead it's a cheaper and more cheerful Pro-Link shock and Showa forks.

That's about as much detail as Honda has released at this stage. We'll have to wait to find out the horsepower, torque and weight figures that will tell us what this thing's really going to be like to ride.

But it's a fun-looking machine that, given Honda's reputation, will certainly do well in markets that appreciate smaller capacity machines.

Source: Honda Asia

3 comments
Malatrope
Feh. Buy a Yamaha V-Star 250 instead. It won't kill your back with a riding position straight from the Spanish Inquisition, will perform better without all the ridiculous fairings that are clearly unnecessary at the speeds a 250 can achieve, won't break down when your oh-so-modern electronic engine control systems die at the worst time, and will ease up on your pocketbook by probably half as much. Also, the spoked wheels will put a smile on your lips...
Daishi
I like the look of it but even the 1000RR actually has a (much) smaller exhaust. That appears to be a cover over the exhaust meant to look like one.
Nathaneal Blemings
Some people enjoy the sport bike riding position. Also a 250cc bike will likely go up to 170kmph and having a fairing absolutely helps, plus its another way to style the bike which some people like. Most people buying a 250cc are only buying it as a beginner bike, with aspirations of much larger bikes once they are more comfortable.... more then likely a larger sportbike if they buy a ninja, so buying something that is completely different doesnt make sense... they want a miniature version of the bike they are going for... so a ninja 250 makes sense. I started on a 375cc and im glad i did over getting a larger bike, Iv had it for 2 years now and im ready to move up as im fully comfortable with this bike and can push it somewhat close to its limits, atleast on the roads. The 250 will serve the same purpose. The bike looks good which is going to be half of it for new riders, and im curious to see actualy performance numbers.