Robotics

Will humanoid robots build tomorrow's aircraft?

Will humanoid robots build tom...
JRL and Airbus Group are working on ways to use humanoid robots in aircraft assembly work
JRL and Airbus Group are working on ways to use humanoid robots in aircraft assembly work
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Planning and control of multi-contact movements by humanoid robot
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Planning and control of multi-contact movements by humanoid robot
Planning and control of multi-contact movements by humanoid robots
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Planning and control of multi-contact movements by humanoid robots
Robot climbing a ladder
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Robot climbing a ladder
JRL is developing algorithms to carry out complex tasks in real time
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JRL is developing algorithms to carry out complex tasks in real time
Robot negotiating an uneven surface
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Robot negotiating an uneven surface
JRL and Airbus Group are working on ways to use humanoid robots in aircraft assembly work
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JRL and Airbus Group are working on ways to use humanoid robots in aircraft assembly work

Robots may build cars by the millions, but they still don't have much to do with assembling airliners – a task where human workers are still essential. To give the organics a helping manipulator, the Joint Robotics Laboratory (JRL) and Airbus Group have embarked on a four-year joint research project to develop humanoid robots that can work on aircraft assembly lines and free workers from tedious and hazardous jobs.

Most airliners are technically built on an assembly line, but the process lacks the economy of scale needed to employ most assembly line techniques, such as robots. This is because airliners are among the most advanced and complicated pieces of engineering on the planet and fewer units are made in an entire production run than a car factory cranks out in a single day.

This is part of the reason aircraft assembly isn't suitable for fixed-base robots or even ones with limited mobility, such as ones mounted on tracks or wheels. Another is that the interior of an airliner is very large and complex with many tight spaces, The latter is so common that assembly and maintenance manuals include detailed, illustrated instructions on how to crawl in to reach certain parts of the aircraft and companies even recruit workers of a particular size to fit inside tight places like the wings. Not surprisingly, this doesn't really lend itself to the approach of tailoring the job to the robot.

Planning and control of multi-contact movements by humanoid robot
Planning and control of multi-contact movements by humanoid robot

Like the VALERI project, JRL, which is a partnership between the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST, Japan) and the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), is working to develop robots capable of working alongside humans in a very robot-unfriendly environment and take on the laborious and dangerous jobs, while freeing up workers for higher-level tasks.

To do this, they need to be capable of moving about in confined areas, often with uneven surfaces, without bumping into surrounding objects. Once in position, they then need to be able to handle screwing, torqueing, tightening bolts, cleaning up metal dust, and inserting parts, and then verify that the task is properly completed.

According to JRL, a humanoid shape allows a robot to carry out a larger number of tasks and is especially well suited for working on aircraft, which are specifically designed in detail to accommodate human workers. Using HRP-2 and HRP-4 robots, the team is working to develop ones that not only walk, but can also move using their entire bodies in what's called multi-contact locomotion to crawl into confined spaces on their hands and knees, and climb ladders and stairs.

Planning and control of multi-contact movements by humanoid robots
Planning and control of multi-contact movements by humanoid robots

To do all this, JRL and its partners are writing new algorithms that carry out complex calculations needed to navigate the interior of an aircraft under construction and then modifying their behavior to take into account uncalculated events, such as an unexpected obstruction, while carrying out a task. These need to be fast enough to operate in real time – especially if the robot is working with a human.

JRL says that it's taking a long view of humanoid robots 10 or 15 years from now by not only anticipating advances in robotics, but also expanding the effort to include civil aircraft and helicopters, as well as spacecraft.

"Given the unique nature of aviation assembly and the specialized character of the tasks involved, Airbus Group has very well-defined needs," says Abderrahmane Kheddar, the director of the JRL. "For instance, robots must be capable of navigating through narrow spaces such as fuselages, and executing complex tasks from a variety of positions. In short, the manufacturer needs humanoid robots that can make human movements such as kneeling or leaning, and that can perform more sophisticated functions, such as screwing or torqueing."

The video below shows the JRL robots in action.

Source: CNRS

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15 comments
Naum Shuv
Ok, it's cool. But you can just bring small wheeled robot and put it inside the plane with "spider" crane
Daishi
>JRL says that it's taking a long view of humanoid robots 10 or 15 years from now I think it's easy to forget that human robots 15 years ago were't much less sophisticated than humanoid robots of today: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESLc26fNAe8 I like the solution used by the winner of the Darpa robotics challenge with wheels on its knees and feet: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGOUSvaQcBs It's out of the box thinking like that that will eventually win the day. The compilation of all the robots falling over in the darpa challenge is pretty entertaining.
Mel Tisdale
When we first came down from the trees (widely recognised as a bad idea) there was no evolutionary pressure to build airplanes. So, instead of making the robot perform like a human, make it perform like you wish a human could. For example, I wish I could have electro-magnetic fingers when trying to install (or retrieve) fiddly little screws. And wouldn't it be handy (literally) to have hands instead of feet? We could even have three or four of each, for that matter. They could even be interchangeable. And while we are at it, there is no reason to limit the number of eyes (with built-in illumination) we have, or their locations. The number and size of its noses are also unrestricted. Relocate the brain and it wouldn't keep banging its head. As an aside, give it a fuel cell with an associated fuel supply and it would make a fantastic rock climber, especially in recovery situations, such as falls, earthquakes etc. with especially rough fingertips for grip. Oh what fun is going to be had by one and all on this little project. Just one word of warning: Robots can be especially dumb and are usually deaf. This means that humans and robots are a dangerous mix.
Chuck Anziulewicz
Robots may build aircraft just like they build cars today. But why should they necessarily be "humanoid"? There's no practical advantage there.
Randolph Garrison
A more humanoid stronger robot could produce a more consistent product working 24/7 without overtime, days off, breaks.
habakak
Such early days. We are more than 15 years away from building robots with this kind of ability. Off course it will be time well spent learning and developing. Robots would also need to be light weight and softer as to not crush or break things, and not to mention solving the power dilemma (it can't be tethered for the most part and hopefully wireless charging will work in a situation like this in 25+ years).
Island Architect
The thing that really needs to be considered is actually People! Since they all can be replaced with automatons what are we going to do with people? How are they going to eat, live, and pursue happiness ? Siegfried Gideon forewarned us with "Mechanization Takes Command". So what is it that you propose that we do?
Bob Flint
It still takes people to program the robots, and with all the recalls in the automotive field, imagine what chaos they could impart in the aviation industry.
ezeflyer
This is the future. But what's going to happen to all the people whose jobs they substitute for?
A'Tuin
@ezeflyer - Soylent Green?