Marine

Hydros HY-X flying yacht features retractable hydrofoils

Hydros HY-X flying yacht featu...
According to Hydros, the HY-X is capable of 30 kn
According to Hydros, the HY-X is capable of 30 kn
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Hydros shows the HY-X in Monaco
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Hydros shows the HY-X in Monaco
The HY-X in Monaco
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The HY-X in Monaco
The retractable hydrofoils provide two boating experiences in one vessel
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The retractable hydrofoils provide two boating experiences in one vessel
The first concrete stop on the way to the HY41 yacht
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The first concrete stop on the way to the HY41 yacht
The HY-X prototype hits the water
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The HY-X prototype hits the water
According to Hydros, the HY-X is capable of 30 kn
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According to Hydros, the HY-X is capable of 30 kn
The HY-X is a 1/2-scale prototype of the upcoming HY41 hydrofoil yacht
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The HY-X is a 1/2-scale prototype of the upcoming HY41 hydrofoil yacht

Retractable hydrofoils have been quite in vogue throughout this year's boat show season. Major shows like Cannes and Monaco have hosted several retractable hydrofoils, including the shape-shifting Kormaran and the Sunreef 40 H. Now, Swiss hydrofoil outfit Hydros has demonstrated its HY-X, the prototype of an eventual 41-foot (12.5-m) yacht that will be able to motor across the water or fly above it.

It would seem that the race is on to get the first 40-foot retractable luxury hydrofoil on the water, as Hydros' planned boat is a mere foot longer than the design previewed by Sunreef. So far, Hydos is winning, having wowed the boat show crowds with the working HY-X prototype, rather than just a rendering.

The design uses a retractable hydrofoil system developed in cooperation with French firm JMKoncept. The two side foils can be deployed into the water at the push of a button, lifting the boat about a meter (3.3 ft) above the surface for reduced drag, higher speeds and improved efficiency.

The first concrete stop on the way to the HY41 yacht
The first concrete stop on the way to the HY41 yacht

Hydros showed the 1/2-scale carbon fiber HY-X prototype at the Cannes and Monaco yacht shows last month. The 20.5-ft (6.25-ft) prototype has a pair of 35-hp engines extended down low enough to accommodate the hydrofoils. The open boat can hit speeds up to 30 knots (34.4 mph, 55.5 km/h), according to Hydros' spec sheet, and offers a 30 percent reduction in fuel consumption by way of its hydrofoils and downsized engines.

JMKoncept lists speed projections for the HY41 yacht at 35 kn (40 mph, 65 km/h) in regular boat mode and 45 kn (52 mph, 83 km/h) in hydrofoil mode, adding that the hydrofoils will also improve maneuverability and help in choppy water. Boat mode, on the other hand, will be ideal for lower speeds and driving to and from the marina.

We'll be watching for more information about the production HY41 at upcoming boat and yacht shows. In the meantime, check out the HY-X prototype in the video below.

Source: Hydros, JMKoncept

Hydros HY-X reduced scale prototype

4 comments
zevulon
there is a certain point where, if you are going to build a motor-craft for both efficiency and moderately high speeds above 20mph-------you should consider redesigning the entire boat for AERODYNAMICS. particularlyly if it is a hydroplaning boat where the hull is now going to be OUT of the water and experiencing aerodynamic drag. if you redesign the boat for aerodynamics----you will get at least 10% better fuel efficieny above 30mph. why? because from the picture , this thing looks like a brick. design a car like this and you will see how 1980's like your mileage is. there is a reason all modern automobiles and trucks are relatively streamlined compared to previous designs------fuel efficiency at higher speeds.
DarkSymphony
The guy in the cover photo looks like he's having so much fun. I mean, sometimes the fake enthusiasm in photoshoots can be a little much, but this chap looks like he's hard at work contemplating the grim realities of life right there.
Michael Flower
Isn't a Yacht supposed to have living accommodation incorporated into the hull design. If anything, I would classify it as a Specialized Runabout or Specialized Go-Fast...
StWils
Zev is right but he does not go quite far enough. Aerodynamics design is important for more than just reducing drag. At these speeds the boat's behaviour is more wing like than boat like. Literally, the boat will behave like an aerofoil. Over the years I have repeatedly seen racers, either monohull or twins, get up high, especially coming off a wave, catch some air and then somersault or roll over. As a boat transitions to hydrofoil flight near the water surface it must be capable of managing surface flight effects. This is especially important regarding cross winds and cross currents. During world war II German, American, and British pilots found that a damaged aircraft that can no longer stay aloft at normal altitudes could still fly slowly just a few feet above the water. Many British and American pilots got safely across the channel this way after losing an engine over France or Germany. The designers need to familiarize themselves with NASA's & Boeings's lifting body research. And, yes, this first version does look like a brick.