Urban Transport

Dubai gets aboard the Hyperloop train

Dubai gets aboard the Hyperloo...
A concept rendering of an underwater Hyperloop next to a Dubai port
A concept rendering of an underwater Hyperloop next to a Dubai port
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A concept rendering of an underwater Hyperloop next to a Dubai port
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A concept rendering of an underwater Hyperloop next to a Dubai port
A rendering of a Hyperloop tube within Dubai's port infrastructure
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A rendering of a Hyperloop tube within Dubai's port infrastructure
A rendering of cargo transported via Hyperloop
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A rendering of cargo transported via Hyperloop
Rendering of an underwater Hyperloop
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Rendering of an underwater Hyperloop

Hyperloop could be heading to the Middle East, thanks to a new deal signed on Monday between Hyperloop One and port operator DP World. The partnership calls for a feasibility study of how the nascent, ultra-fast transport technology could improve Dubai's Jebel Ali Port, but both parties hope that's just the beginning.

The study will look at the possibility of building a Hyperloop to take freight off container ships arriving at Jebel Ali and transport it via the technology's system of pods moving through pressurized tubes to an inland depot that DP World plans to build further inland.

"By having a system where a box can be taken off a ship and dropped into the tube or pod, we are moving activity that would otherwise be on the island terminal as well as reducing the size of the terminal you need to build," said Hyperloop One founding board member Peter Diamandis.

The Los Angeles-based startup says a Hyperloop can fit within Dubai's existing transportation corridors and could reduce freeway traffic by taking cargo transport trucks off roads. DP World says it can even foresee using a "submerged floating Hyperloop" located next to its huge new terminal built on a man-made island.

Rendering of an underwater Hyperloop
Rendering of an underwater Hyperloop

Hyperloop One isn't the only startup looking to commercialize a version of the technology originally open sourced by Elon Musk three years ago. Hyperloop Transportation Technologies has its own plans for a pilot passenger track in California. But Hyperloop One has been stealing all the headlines lately, with public tests at the site of its new Nevada construction facility and other initiatives in Russia and Finland.

Even with the latest in a string of globe-trotting agreements, we've still yet to see a complete Hyperloop proof of concept. Regardless, it seems the worldwide Hyperloop race is on and Dubai is now in the mix.

"We firmly believe that this study is the first step towards the construction of the Hyperloop in Dubai," said Shervin Pishevar, cofounder and Executive Chairman of Hyperloop One.

Source: Hyperloop One

4 comments
Jose Gros
Hi!: the Hyperloop is a wonderful concept, that deserves good luck, however, it may be good some questioning about it. The same as the Nicaragua canal works are better started in its higher points, the central mountains, in order not to waste energy and money in civil engineering that may be sooner or later drowned by the Sea Level Rise from thawing ices (please, hear: '5 feet high and risin', by Johnny Cash) increase in Sea level that could be as high as 6 metres by 2019, and in the end, above 60 metres or more, this drowning, not only the low parts of Nicaragua channel, but many possible hyperloop tracks in many sites, not to cite places as Washington DC, NYC, Paris, London, Florida, Danemark,... I don't know if the magnetic levitation technology applied to the concrete track of the Spanish: 'Tren vertebrado', 'Vertebrate train', would allow to travel as fast as the Hyperloop, but I really love this technology since its presentation in the 60s, 'Tren vertebrado' that looks sound, safe, and economical. (see: Espacenet for patents, all expired)
habakak
For cargo transportation the Hyperloop is a much better idea vs human transportation. Areas with high population density have no space to build these things. And areas with enough space, has no population to demand these services. And in most first world countries, there are just too many laws, restrictions and land-owner issues (looking at you, America) for this to be put in place. And that is IF the technology will work economically. The Hyperloop won't be reality (it most likely will eventually) for at least another 25 years. Look at where we are with space tourism. The X prize for that was won over a decade ago. Same with the genome, coded in 2001 or 2003 depending on who you believe. It still has not benefited the average human being. Who do you know that receives drugs or therapy or treatment based on their genome being sequenced to develop treatment? It will be another decade or two before it goes mainstream.
Jimjam
Why not just use regular rail for moving freight? Time is not valuable to freight as it is to human cargo.
White Druid
Addressing some prior comments: Perhaps because rail would cost as much if not more per mile than a hyperloop system? We find space in crowded cities for more parking structures and tall buildings and roads and such and even figure out where to put new airports. We can find a place to locate hyperloop hubs. I don't envision there being a single loop, but more that there is a packet/capsule switched network and lots of local loops that would connect into the mainline and allow capsules to merge into the stream heading in or out of the city as needed. I live near San Antonio, TX and can envision a hyperloop paralleling I35 from San Antonio to DFW and down I45 from DFW to Houston and back on I10 to San Antonio. Parallel loops would run each direction. Local loops would be coming off in several cities along the way such as Austin, Temple, Waco, College Station etc. Maybe additional local "station" loops would exist as well depending on the cost of creating a local loop. As it would be built in two loops, one heading each direction you'd be able to have your packet/capsule targeted for any where on the loop and it would accelerate up to speed and insert itself into the flow in whichever direction was the shortest. At 600mph even diverting to Houston to get to College Station would be faster than a direct drive from San Antonio.