Tiny Houses

Used shipping container turned into tiny home for two

Used shipping container turned...
The Intellectual Tiny Home will set you back US$62,000
The Intellectual Tiny Home will set you back US$62,000
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The exterior of the Intellectual Tiny Home has cedar shelving attached, which can be used to create a green wall
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The exterior of the Intellectual Tiny Home has cedar shelving attached, which can be used to create a green wall
The Intellectual Tiny Home's kitchen sink
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The Intellectual Tiny Home's kitchen sink
View towards the Intellectual Tiny Home's lounge and bedroom from the kitchen
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View towards the Intellectual Tiny Home's lounge and bedroom from the kitchen
The Intellectual Tiny Home was built using a recycled shipping container
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The Intellectual Tiny Home was built using a recycled shipping container
The Intellectual Tiny Home will set you back US$62,000
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The Intellectual Tiny Home will set you back US$62,000
The intellectual Tiny Home has a total floorspace of 320 sq ft (29.7 sq m)
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The intellectual Tiny Home has a total floorspace of 320 sq ft (29.7 sq m)
The Intellectual Tiny Home is accessed by two French doors
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The Intellectual Tiny Home is accessed by two French doors
The Intellectual Tiny Home is heated by an electric fireplace in the living room, plus a flat panel heater in the bedroom
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The Intellectual Tiny Home is heated by an electric fireplace in the living room, plus a flat panel heater in the bedroom
The Intellectual Tiny Home's kitchen includes plenty of cabinet space
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The Intellectual Tiny Home's kitchen includes plenty of cabinet space
The Intellectual Tiny Home's lounge area
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The Intellectual Tiny Home's lounge area
The Intellectual Tiny home is built from an old shipping container
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The Intellectual Tiny home is built from an old shipping container
The Intellectual Tiny Home is based on a 40 ft (12 m)-long shipping container
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The Intellectual Tiny Home is based on a 40 ft (12 m)-long shipping container
Designer Maggie Hartje of Revival Designs told us that the insulation used is closed spray foam, installed on the ceilings, walls and floor
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Designer Maggie Hartje of Revival Designs told us that the insulation used is closed spray foam, installed on the ceilings, walls and floor
Inside the intellectual Tiny Home's bathroom
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Inside the intellectual Tiny Home's bathroom
The intellectual Tiny Home's bathroom includes a full-sized shower
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The intellectual Tiny Home's bathroom includes a full-sized shower
Inside the Intellectual Tiny Home's bedroom 
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Inside the Intellectual Tiny Home's bedroom 
The Intellectual Tiny Home's bedroom includes some storage space
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The Intellectual Tiny Home's bedroom includes some storage space
The intellectual Tiny Home's bathroom includes a full-sized shower
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The intellectual Tiny Home's bathroom includes a full-sized shower
The Intellectual Tiny Home's bathroom features a washer/dryer
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The Intellectual Tiny Home's bathroom features a washer/dryer
View gallery - 19 images

Shipping container homes are usually a love them or hate them kind of deal. Fans point out that they offer a potentially sustainable and inexpensive home, while the other side of the argument focuses on significant issues like insulation and the constraints of living in a small metal box. While the Intellectual Tiny Home probably won't change any minds in the latter camp, the former should find a lot to like in its smart styling and neat single-bedroom layout.

The recently completed Intellectual Tiny Home is based on a 40 ft (12 m)-long recycled shipping container and has a total floorspace of 320 sq ft (29.7 sq m). Unlike the Custom Container Living model that was cut and extended vertically to fit in a loft bedroom, this container home is laid-out on one floor. Still, there's enough room inside for two people.

Access to the home is gained by a couple of double French doors and the exterior has cedar shelving attached, which can be used to create a green wall.

Inside, the home includes one bedroom with queen-size bed and storage space. Elsewhere lies a living room with space for a TV and couch, and a bathroom with shower, toilet, vanity unit, and a washer/dryer. The kitchen, meanwhile, includes a full-size fridge, induction cook top, microwave, dishwasher, and cabinets.

The intellectual Tiny Home has a total floorspace of 320 sq ft (29.7 sq m)
The intellectual Tiny Home has a total floorspace of 320 sq ft (29.7 sq m)

Flooring is bamboo throughout and the Intellectual Tiny Home gets its electricity from a standard hookup. Heating is provided by an electric fireplace in the living room, plus a flat panel heater in the bedroom. Designer Maggie Hartje of Revival Designs told us that the insulation used is closed spray foam, installed on the ceilings, walls and floor.

The Intellectual Tiny Home is being promoted for use as a full-time tiny house, guest house, or granny flat and will set you back US$62,000. It's currently located in Longmont, Colorado.

There's been a rise in interesting shipping container projects recently and a few we've covered include BIG's student housing and this model which has enough room for a small family.

Source: Roostspace

View gallery - 19 images
11 comments
MerlinGuy
Once again an overpriced tiny house coming in at just under $200 a square foot. Anyone who can afford that can afford a lot more since you still need to buy the land and prep it for power, water, and sanitation. That should drive the cost up to about $300 a foot. These kind of homes are just expensive boxes.
How about reviewing an affordable tiny house? Something that adheres to the building codes and comes in at $100 a foot.
Anybody?
autoexec.bat
+1 MerlinGuy
Dan Parker
Intellectual? How smart do you have to be to pay that sort of money to live in what looks like, (from the outside anyway), a pet crematorium? For $62K you could buy a nice, smaller home in NE Minneapolis that's convenient to work and shopping, it'll be connected to city water/sewer along with all the other utilities and you'd be part of a community.
Paul Anthony
Why would one choose this over a prefab aka trailer home? You can get a prefab in double wide. This is small and boxy and just not a "house"
Stephen N Russell
Lisc & reuse said containers worldwide, more jobs & see price drop to 40K per unit. Ideal for homeless.
Bob
Compare this to a 40 foot house trailer and see how much better the trailer is at utilizing space at a much lower price. Take a look at a 40 foot RV which uses 12volt, 110volt,or propane appliances for off the grid locations and still costs a lot less than this. For some reason most tiny homes are designed to waste space.
Dan Parker
"...the exterior has cedar shelving attached..."
Intellectual Tiny husband: Honey, I've finished installing the exterior cedar shelving. Come out and take a look. IT wife: (pauses) Snookums, aren't shelves supposed to run horizontally... you know, so we can put stuff on them? IT husband: DOH!
CourtA.Newkirk
In many parts of the country you can buy an existing stick-built home, w/infrastructure, on a normal sized lot for the same money. Upgrade the energy efficiency and you have an investment you can make money on, (depending on market conditions). Although I find the design and the up-cycled container excellent, I'll defer to a traditional home every time.
Leonard Foster Jr
Once again Price Price Price. Way out of line.
KimberlyBStone
I've seen better prison cell design. Insufficient # and placement of windows for natural light and ventilation. It does get hot in Longmont and they'll broil in summer. There are also many wonderful Colorado days when you don't need heat or AC, but again, no proper ventilation. Two chairs is not equal to a living room. The huge fridge is not well incorporated into the design. Skylights would have been a great addition. The bathroom mirrors annoy the crap out of me. Walking right in to the kitchen is a nuisance if someone's working there. Wasted space. No textures, comfort, style, personality. This is what a container home should NOT be.