Automotive

Car-jack-on-steroids exposes vehicles' underbellies

It's a Jack can reportedly tilt cars weighing as much as 3.5 tons (3.2 tonnes) up to 80 degrees
It's a Jack can reportedly tilt cars weighing as much as 3.5 tons (3.2 tonnes) up to 80 degrees
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It's a Jack's planned retail price is $1,500
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It's a Jack's planned retail price is $1,500
It's a Jack can reportedly tilt cars weighing as much as 3.5 tons (3.2 tonnes) up to 80 degrees
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It's a Jack can reportedly tilt cars weighing as much as 3.5 tons (3.2 tonnes) up to 80 degrees

Although professional mechanics use a lift or a pit to get at the undersides of cars, home-based tinkerers don't usually have such a setup in their garage. And while using a wheeled creeper to squeeze underneath the vehicle is one alternative, the new "It's a Jack" lets users tilt their autos over instead.

Made of powder-coated steel, the jack incorporates a ramped platform which the vehicle's front wheels are driven up onto. After those wheels are securely strapped in place, a hand-operated cable winch is then used to lift one end of that platform up off the floor, taking the car along with it.

According to the designer, vehicles weighing as much as 3.5 tons (3.2 tonnes) can be tilted up to 80 degrees within five minutes. The tilting action is claimed to place no stress on the chassis or wheel bearings, with an extension of the jack apparently preventing the car from tipping right over.

It's a Jack's planned retail price is $1,500
It's a Jack's planned retail price is $1,500

Caster wheels on the underside of the device make it easier to move around, when it's not lifting a vehicle. And in order to save space, it can be disassembled for storage.

Should you be interested, It's a Jack is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign. A pledge of US$1,000 will get you one, when and if they reach production. The planned retail price is $1,500.

It can be seen in use, in the video below.

Sources: Kickstarter, It's a Jack

It's a jack

9 comments
midas
I could've used one of these a few times when replacing my exhaust or catalytic converter.....
guzmanchinky
Well THAT looks interesting. And a bit dangerous? Would the fluids leak out at that angle? I guess if you don't have access to a lift it's a good option, but you would have to be VERY careful...
Nik
It looks like it could be useful, BUT, some of the jobs I would need it for, would need the wheels removed....! Next! (So, how could I make one that will allow that, and cost me less than $100?....)
yawood
Possible problems with this approach are fluids leaking into places they should not be and batteries leaking acid. Also one of the main reasons for needing to be under the car is to drain and refill oil from sumps, transfer cases or differentials but none of these can be done while the car is on an angle like that. A pit, ramps or hoist are much better alternatives.
Martin Winlow
Seriously! *New*????!!!! CJ Autos (in the UK) have been selling these for *donkey's years*! http://www.cjautosheywood.co.uk/bascroller.shtml
Fletcher
When you turn the vehicle you put all the weight on different stress points that were not designed to hold these loads for extended periods of time. Couldn't weight pushing in, instead of up, potentially cause problems (depending on the vehicle) on CV bearings, control arm bolts/bushings, steering linkage, Tie rods, sway-bars, and probably some other things I haven't thought of?
Douglas Bennett Rogers
Use like a regular jack to get two wheels off of the ground. Will save a lot of time and effort compared to blocking and jacking four separate wheels.
noteugene
I can see this working for a riding or ZTR mower. For a car, kind of dumb.Besides, they have lifts for home use that are designed much better than this. Price, about the same, so why buy this?
ljaques
Definitely a good idea for niche service areas. I'd never get under one as a single point lift, though. Include a safety jack stand with it, guys. Price is up there, but the ROI will probably be pretty quick for industrious souls.
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