Architecture

German town digs innovative new auditorium

The Konzerthaus Blaibach when empty (Photo: Edward Beierle)
The Konzerthaus Blaibach when empty (Photo: Edward Beierle)
View 37 Images
The Konzerthaus Blaibach building is angled downwards instead of laid flat, creating an angle down to its auditorium (Photo: Edward Beierle)
1/37
The Konzerthaus Blaibach building is angled downwards instead of laid flat, creating an angle down to its auditorium (Photo: Edward Beierle)
The Konzerthaus Blaibach was completed in September 2014 (Photo: Edward Beierle)
2/37
The Konzerthaus Blaibach was completed in September 2014 (Photo: Edward Beierle)
The top of the Konzerthaus Blaibach rises above the ground, while the bottom end appears to be buried (Photo: Edward Beierle)
3/37
The top of the Konzerthaus Blaibach rises above the ground, while the bottom end appears to be buried (Photo: Edward Beierle)
The Konzerthaus Blaibach was designed by architect Peter Haimerl (Photo: Edward Beierle)
4/37
The Konzerthaus Blaibach was designed by architect Peter Haimerl (Photo: Edward Beierle)
The outside rendering of the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
5/37
The outside rendering of the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
A gap between the sections of the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
6/37
A gap between the sections of the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
The Konzerthaus Blaibach is located in the town center (Photo: Edward Beierle)
7/37
The Konzerthaus Blaibach is located in the town center (Photo: Edward Beierle)
A view of some of the other buildings surrounding the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
8/37
A view of some of the other buildings surrounding the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
There is a gap below the raised end of the Konzerthaus Blaibach that allows people to descend into the foyer (Photo: Edward Beierle)
9/37
There is a gap below the raised end of the Konzerthaus Blaibach that allows people to descend into the foyer (Photo: Edward Beierle)
An orchestra in the performance area of the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
10/37
An orchestra in the performance area of the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
The Konzerthaus Blaibach full to capacity (Photo: Edward Beierle)
11/37
The Konzerthaus Blaibach full to capacity (Photo: Edward Beierle)
The Konzerthaus Blaibach when empty (Photo: Edward Beierle)
12/37
The Konzerthaus Blaibach when empty (Photo: Edward Beierle)
The Konzerthaus Blaibach is made from pre-cast sections of concrete (Photo: Edward Beierle)
13/37
The Konzerthaus Blaibach is made from pre-cast sections of concrete (Photo: Edward Beierle)
The concrete gives the inside of the Konzerthaus Blaibach a plain and stark look (Photo: Edward Beierle)
14/37
The concrete gives the inside of the Konzerthaus Blaibach a plain and stark look (Photo: Edward Beierle)
Lighting strips are hidden behind slits in the walls and ceiling of the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
15/37
Lighting strips are hidden behind slits in the walls and ceiling of the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
LED lighting makes the Konzerthaus Blaibach auditorium look very light (Photo: Edward Beierle)
16/37
LED lighting makes the Konzerthaus Blaibach auditorium look very light (Photo: Edward Beierle)
Parts of the Konzerthaus Blaibach auditorium have a very angular design (Photo: Edward Beierle)
17/37
Parts of the Konzerthaus Blaibach auditorium have a very angular design (Photo: Edward Beierle)
A close-up of some of the angular design features of the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
18/37
A close-up of some of the angular design features of the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
A door into the Konzerthaus Blaibach auditorium that's set into the wall (Photo: Edward Beierle)
19/37
A door into the Konzerthaus Blaibach auditorium that's set into the wall (Photo: Edward Beierle)
The angular design is used in part to improve the acoustics in the Konzerthaus Blaibach auditorium (Photo: Edward Beierle)
20/37
The angular design is used in part to improve the acoustics in the Konzerthaus Blaibach auditorium (Photo: Edward Beierle)
The mesh seats in the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
21/37
The mesh seats in the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
The mesh seats in the Konzerthaus Blaibach look almost transparent (Photo: Edward Beierle)
22/37
The mesh seats in the Konzerthaus Blaibach look almost transparent (Photo: Edward Beierle)
A view towards the rear of the Konzerthaus Blaibach auditorium (Photo: Edward Beierle)
23/37
A view towards the rear of the Konzerthaus Blaibach auditorium (Photo: Edward Beierle)
A close-up of a concrete feature in the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
24/37
A close-up of a concrete feature in the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
A close-up of a concrete feature in the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
25/37
A close-up of a concrete feature in the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
A close-up of a concrete feature in the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
26/37
A close-up of a concrete feature in the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
A view from the rear of the Konzerthaus Blaibach auditorium (Photo: Edward Beierle)
27/37
A view from the rear of the Konzerthaus Blaibach auditorium (Photo: Edward Beierle)
A view up the side of the Konzerthaus Blaibach auditorium (Photo: Edward Beierle)
28/37
A view up the side of the Konzerthaus Blaibach auditorium (Photo: Edward Beierle)
Wooden paneling is used on the walls and ceilings at some points inside the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
29/37
Wooden paneling is used on the walls and ceilings at some points inside the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
The wooden paneling in the Konzerthaus Blaibach helps to soften the stark concrete (Photo: Edward Beierle)
30/37
The wooden paneling in the Konzerthaus Blaibach helps to soften the stark concrete (Photo: Edward Beierle)
A view of some of the paneling used in the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
31/37
A view of some of the paneling used in the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
One of the public areas in the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
32/37
One of the public areas in the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
A view inside one of the toilets in the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
33/37
A view inside one of the toilets in the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
LED lighting being used to illuminate performers at the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
34/37
LED lighting being used to illuminate performers at the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
An orchestra in the performance area of the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
35/37
An orchestra in the performance area of the Konzerthaus Blaibach (Photo: Edward Beierle)
A section view of the Konzerthaus Blaibach
36/37
A section view of the Konzerthaus Blaibach
A plan of the Konzerthaus Blaibach
37/37
A plan of the Konzerthaus Blaibach

Buildings that contain auditoriums generally need to be large in order to fit tiered seating inside. A recently completed concert hall in Blaibach, Germany, however, creates this tiered effect in a simpler way. The whole building slopes down towards the front of the performance space.

Konzerthaus Blaibach is one of a number of new buildings that have been built as part of the redevelopment of the town center. Architect Peter Haimerl, who also designed the town hall, says that the concert hall is central to the town center's revitalization.

The design looks very much like a large rectangular building that has been buried into the ground at one end. The exposed end rises above the ground leaving a gap so that visitors can descend the steps to the public spaces housed below it. These include the foyer, bar and toilets. From the foyer, it is possible to enter the auditorium itself.

The Konzerthaus Blaibach building is angled downwards instead of laid flat, creating an angle down to its auditorium (Photo: Edward Beierle)
The Konzerthaus Blaibach building is angled downwards instead of laid flat, creating an angle down to its auditorium (Photo: Edward Beierle)

The auditorium has a striking design, with large expanses of the pre-cast concrete from which the building is made and LED lights hidden behind slits in the walls and ceiling, creating. The room tapers slightly towards the performance area, sharpening the focus on the performers and helping to project sound towards the rear of the space (the tilted surfaces inside are designed specifically to improve the acoustics).

The auditorium features mesh seating that looks almost transparent, continuing the building's sense of simplicity. Outside the auditorium, on the other hand, wooden paneling is used on walls and ceilings to soften the stark concrete design.

Konzerthaus Blaibach was completed in September of this year. You can see more images of the building in the gallery.

Source: Peter Haimerl

3 comments
Bob Flint
How are the acoustics, and an audio would be nice? Also mobility challenged may find it difficult certainly in a wheel chair, didn't see any ramp.
mvp
Brilliant design if lacking space! However, I prefer the comfort of sitting in cushioned seats with higher backs while enjoying musical concerts. Those wire mesh chairs would be a deal breaker for me.
Brian M
Look more like a WW2 concrete bunker built over much of occupied Europe, by (you guessed it) the Germans!
Thanks for reading our articles. Please consider subscribing to New Atlas Plus.
By doing so you will be supporting independent journalism, plus you will get the benefits of a faster, ad-free experience.