Laptops

"World's most powerful laptop" boasts a 24 GB GPU

At IFA this week, Asus unveiled the world's most powerful laptop, the ASUS ProArt StudioBook Pro One
At IFA this week, Asus unveiled the world's most powerful laptop, the ProArt StudioBook One
View 2 Images
At IFA this week, Asus unveiled the world's most powerful laptop, the ASUS ProArt StudioBook Pro One
1/2
At IFA this week, Asus unveiled the world's most powerful laptop, the ProArt StudioBook One
The ProArt StudioBook One packs a 24 GB Nvidia Quadro RTX 6000 GPU.
2/2
The ProArt StudioBook One packs a 24 GB Nvidia Quadro RTX 6000 GPU.

For people who are just browsing the web, writing documents and checking email, any old laptop will basically be enough. But data scientists, professional animators and engineers might need a little more grunt under the hood. At IFA 2019 this week, Asus unveiled the most graphically-powerful laptop ever – the ProArt StudioBook One, boasting a frankly ridiculous 24 GB GPU.

That power come from a mobile version of Nvidia’s Quadro RTX 6000, the desktop versions of which were unveiled at SIGGRAPH last year. Built on the Turing architecture, the main gimmick of this GPU is real-time ray tracing, which is claimed to trace the path of light through virtual scenes and produce realistic reflection, refraction and scattering.

With 24 GB of this graphical grunt, that makes the ProArt StudioBook One the most powerful laptop around by quite a wide margin. The runner-up title also belongs to Nvidia, with laptops packing the 16 GB Quadro RTX 5000 which came out earlier this year.

The ProArt StudioBook One packs a 24 GB Nvidia Quadro RTX 6000 GPU.
The ProArt StudioBook One packs a 24 GB Nvidia Quadro RTX 6000 GPU.

If a 24 GB GPU seems like overkill for even the most hardcore of gamers, that’s because it is. The 8 GB RTX 2080 is plenty for consumer needs – instead, the Quadro RTX lineup, and the laptops it’s built into, are designed for business, engineering and scientific use. That includes crunching huge datasets, editing 8K video, and creating detailed 3D animations and environments.

Of course, the ProArt StudioBook One boasts high-end specs besides the GPU as well. It’s powered by an Intel Core i9 2.4 GHz octacore processor and 32 GB of RAM, contains 1 TB of SSD storage, and is topped off with a 15.6-inch 4K screen.

Because those beefy components might be prone to overheating, Asus has moved them to the top of the device. That way, they’re behind the screen when it’s open, so it won’t get too hot sitting on your legs. A new cooling system opens the chassis up by a 4.57-degree angle when in use too, letting more air get to the CPU and GPU. The heat is vented out the sides of the display, out of harm’s way.

There’s no word on availability or pricing for the ProArt StudioBook One just yet, but considering the Quadro RTX 6000 itself carries a price tag of over US$3,500, it’s a fair bet that it won’t come cheap.

Sources: Asus, Nvidia

5 comments
paul314
Does it come with earplugs? This is utterly ridiculous, and of course I want one. (I also wonder what it throttles down to when it hits any kind of real processing load.
Aleksandra Wladyczynska
32 GB Memory... My 2015 laptop has the same amount of RAM. For my new laptop I will probably choose a simpler one as I noticed that I work more and more in the cloud. There one has even more computing power available. I think the same will same counts for other engineers & scientists. I wouldn't refuse this laptop I've my employer would give it to me though.
Alpha_Lyrae
Problem phrasing: "With 24 GB of this graphical grunt, that makes the ProArt StudioBook One the most powerful laptop around by quite a wide margin." Huge quibble: Memory quantity has no bearing on graphical processing power; this article reads like it's conflating the two. Absolutely none. Local VRAM is for storing working assets, so yes, 8K video editing will probably need more VRAM for best performance without having to use slow system RAM for overflow storage. Most games will not use up a 24GB framebuffer for textures unless they're fully uncompressed. But, if you want to accurately represent GPU processing power, the typical unit is FLOPs. Non-mobile, discrete Quadro RTX 6000's process around 16.3 TeraFLOPs, likely around a 1770MHz boost clock. There are thermal limitations in laptops, so I expect this to be lower in mobile products depending on sustained boost clocks.
ljaques
Comes with a 29" fan for GPU cooling!
Michael Lauzon
Can it play "Crysis"..?!