Bicycles

Litelok offers lightweight flexible bike security

Litelok offers lightweight fle...
The Litelok weighs less than a U-lock, yet is claimed to be as secure
The Litelok weighs less than a U-lock, yet is claimed to be as secure
View 5 Images
The Litelok weighs less than a U-lock, yet is claimed to be as secure
1/5
The Litelok weighs less than a U-lock, yet is claimed to be as secure
A couple of straps are included for carrying the Litelok on one's bike, as is a strap-equipped pouch
2/5
A couple of straps are included for carrying the Litelok on one's bike, as is a strap-equipped pouch
The steel inline locking mechanism was developed by UK manufacturer Henry Squire and Sons Ltd
3/5
The steel inline locking mechanism was developed by UK manufacturer Henry Squire and Sons Ltd
It locks shut without the need for a key
4/5
It locks shut without the need for a key
The whole thing weighs less than 1 kg (2.2 lb)
5/5
The whole thing weighs less than 1 kg (2.2 lb)

It's kind of ironic that while many cyclists ride lightweight bikes, they still carry heavy-duty U-locks that weigh several pounds. In most cases, however, lighter cable locks can easily be defeated with a set of bolt cutters. That's why Prof. Neil Barron, a former aeronautical engineer, has created the Litelok. It's light and flexible like a cable lock, but reportedly stands up to over five minutes of attack from tools such as bolt cutters, jacks and hack saws.

The Litelok's strap is made from a composite called Boaflexicore, which consists of multiple layers of unspecified lightweight materials. The steel inline locking mechanism was developed by UK manufacturer Henry Squire and Sons Ltd, and locks shut without the need for a key.

The whole thing weighs less than 1 kg (2.2 lb). By contrast, the commonly-used Kryptonite Evolution U-lock tips the scales at 1.7 kg (3.75 lb).

A couple of straps are included for carrying the Litelok on one's bike, as is a strap-equipped pouch
A couple of straps are included for carrying the Litelok on one's bike, as is a strap-equipped pouch

A couple of straps are included for carrying the Litelok on one's bike, as is a strap-equipped pouch. If it looks like a single 29-inch (736-mm) lock might be too short to meet a user's needs, they can order a package in which two locks can be linked together end-to-end, and unlocked using the same single key.

Barron is currently raising production funds for the Litelok, on Kickstarter. A pledge of £70 (about US$103) will currently get you one, when and if they're ready to go.

Source: Kickstarter

10 comments
Freyr Gunnar
Unless 1) I'm mistaken and 2) the rear wheel uses anti-lock skewers, a thief would only need to undo the quick-release nut and walk away with the bike minus the wheel: http://images.gizmag.com/hero/litelok.jpg
Kiwi Jono
While I like the idea, I think some of these concepts are not particularly practical. A lot of these locks only lock one wheel and perhaps frame. Typically wheels are quick disconnect. Here in Christchurch bikes that are not locked to something are sometimes stolen. Also I have several times seen: * two wheels locked to a lamppost (frame stolen) * frame locked to lamppost (wheels stolen).
William Sherrett
OnGuard mini bulldog, my choice, weighs < 2 lbs., MSRP about $50.
Harvey
@Freyr Gunnar: The lock is passing through the triangle formed by the seat tube, seat stays, and chain stays. http://s1.hubimg.com/u/1466340_f520.jpg I'll need to see a full set of video proof that the lock is durable. I have a TiGr lock and watching that little German lady defeat it with 24" bolt cutters was a little disheartening.
BZD
@Freyr Gunnar 1)You are mistaken since 2) the lock goes through the wheel and the rear double triangle of the frame so unless unlocked or broken apart the wheel and frame goes together regardless of any quick-release. I like the idea of a lighter bike lock only I would like it to be longer to lock the bike to a like a stationary object like a lamp post, a tree or a bike rack. Of course a two lock solution also works but that seems like a more expensive and heavier solution, although of course the flexibility of having two locks could sometime be handy. @William Sherrett Those Mini locks are too small and the wire version seems not like much of a challenge to any bike thief other than one which just want any bike that can be had. Cheap though.
Dave Kennett
It looks like a winder but why so small of lock and why just bikes ? You get more motorcycle riders buying then cyclist alone. Plus the market for motorcycle is far bigger I feel. I buy it if it was at least 1.5 feet long . On the downside I guess no one notices that they fail to show that the Lock part it's self can withstand attack. Make me wonder if that's the weak point ?
Nelson Hyde Chick
I have always felt like a fool spending lots of money on the lightest bike possible, and then lugging twenty pounds of locks with me when I went bicycling.
anobium
I am waiting for a bike lock that will resist a battery powered angle grinder. Photos exist of bike racks sliced apart by these devices.
Jeffry Mercer
This might be a semi ok solution, but seems like getting something like the spybike gps tracker, would be a better idea if you wanted to get your bike back, after it was stolen.
YuraG
@anobium - I doubt there is or will ever be an affordable or practical lock that can resist an angle grinder. On the other hand, what will you use if you can't open your lock?