Theft

  • Bicycle seats are relatively easy to steal, which is where the user-removable SeatyGo comes in.
  • Invented by siblings Joe and Christine Edell, the AirLock is both a tire pump and a cable lock.
  • ​More and more, we're seeing bike locks that open not with a key or combination, but with a fingerprint or Bluetooth signal. Almost all of those, however, are U-locks. What if you prefer the more compact form factor and wider reach of a folding lock? Well, that's where the ZiiLock comes in.
  • ​Although U-locks are generally considered to be the most secure type of bike lock, the fact is that a portable angle grinder can typically cut through their shackle in a matter of seconds. Washington, DC-based Altor Locks has set out to address that problem, with its big n' beefy SAF Lock.
  • ​It's always a risk, leaving detachable lights on a bike that's parked in a public place. It can also be a hassle to carry them with you, though. A group of North Carolina-based entrepreneurs has developed an alternative, in the form of lights that are attached to a bike-mounted U-lock.
  • ​While bicycle U-locks may provide better security than their cable counterparts, the things can be a hassle to carry around in a backpack. The EverLock was created in response to this problem, as it's actually built into the bike's seatpost.
  • ​If you like free money, one illegal way of getting it is to falsely claim that you bought an item which got stolen, so your insurance will cover the cost of a new one. You'll have to fill out a police report, however, and you could soon be caught out by software that detects bogus reports.
  • ​Locks are all very well and good, but it always helps to have an extra layer of security that discourages bike thieves just a little bit more. British cyclists James Sheppard and Matthew Leach have developed just such a layer, in the form of the strobing, screaming Limpet.
  • ​Locking your bike up to an immovable object is obviously the best way of keeping it from being stolen while parked, but what if you're just making a quick stop? Well, you should still lock it to something, although inventor Mark Waldin thinks his Quick Stop Bike Lock may suffice when needed.
  • ​If you routinely park your bike in cramped areas such as a multi-bike racks, then there may be times when you find your lock rather difficult to access upon leaving. It was with this in mind that LA-based cyclist Scott Gold created the "two-faced" Option Lock.
  • ​Bicycle locks can be a hassle to cart around, which is why we've seen ones that double as part OF the bike, such as its handlebars, seatpost, pedal and saddle. One of the latest, the Nexibi, is a folding lock that also serves as a rear rack.
  • ​If you don't have a garage or enough room in your home, it's certainly possible to lock your bike up outside … although that leaves it open to the weather and parts-thieves. That's why the Alpen Bike Capsule was created. It's designed to keep your steed enclosed and secure while stored outdoors.