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Eco-friendly LED lamp brightens without batteries or plugs

Eco-friendly LED lamp brighten...
The Lumir C lamp uses heat generated by small candles to power LED lights
The Lumir C lamp uses heat generated by small candles to power LED lights
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The Lumir C lamp uses heat generated by small candles to power LED lights
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The Lumir C lamp uses heat generated by small candles to power LED lights
The Lumir C LED lamp comes in a "spot" style, which offers up to 60 lm of directional lighting
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The Lumir C LED lamp comes in a "spot" style, which offers up to 60 lm of directional lighting
The Lumir C LED lamp comes in a "mood" style, which offers up to 15 lm of area lighting
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The Lumir C LED lamp comes in a "mood" style, which offers up to 15 lm of area lighting
With a scented candle, the Lumir C LED lamp can create a personal, relaxing atmosphere
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With a scented candle, the Lumir C LED lamp can create a personal, relaxing atmosphere
Sized like a water bottle that vaguely resembles a lighthouse, the Lumir C is designed simple, portable, but with a touch of attractive grace
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Sized like a water bottle that vaguely resembles a lighthouse, the Lumir C is designed simple, portable, but with a touch of attractive grace

LED lighting has widespread appeal due to energy-efficient output and low cost of manufacturing. Companies are now adding features such as sensors, wireless connectivity, adjustable color, or even built-in speakers into the mix, but this LED lamp takes a different approach by removing a critical component. The Lumir C is designed without any external power supply, instead operating off of a single candle.

When severe weather knocks down power grids, it can serve as a reminder of how some developing countries still don't have the luxury of electricity. Candles and kerosene lamps are commonly used in such places, with the latter known to be hazardous and poor for human health. The Lumir C LED lamp joins the likes of GravityLight and SALt lamp as an eco-friendly alternative, illuminating without the need of sun, batteries, or electricity.

The Lumir C is designed to light up its LEDs through the heat energy of a small candle – an application of the thermoelectric effect we've seen in similar products such as the PowerPot and Lumen flashlight. The difference in temperature is what creates the electric voltage, which can be harnessed without any moving parts. A candle alone is capable of outputting about 15 lm. By covering it with a Lumir C, users can enjoy up to another 15 or 60 lm, depending on which lamp style is chosen.

With a scented candle, the Lumir C LED lamp can create a personal, relaxing atmosphere
With a scented candle, the Lumir C LED lamp can create a personal, relaxing atmosphere

Sized like a water bottle that vaguely resembles a lighthouse, the Lumir C's design is simple, portable, and has a definite touch of style. Feet at the base of the lamp are spaced for proper air flow to support combustion. A transparent body shields flames from breezes while allowing light to pass through. Right above where the candle sits is a heatsink that captures radiated heat, which is then turned into power for the LEDs by the thermoelectric module.

There are two styles. The "mood" style lamp has a foursome of 0.2 W LEDs under a soft diffuser at the top that are capable of up to 15 lm of area lighting. The "spot" style lamp features a single, 1 W, direction-adjustable LED that can emit up to 60 lm of brightness. The Lumir C lamps light up shortly after having a candle placed underneath. Those looking to create more of a relaxing atmosphere can opt for scented tea lights, while the citronella kind can help keep areas a little more bug-free.

The Lumir C LED lamp has just launched on Kickstarter, having raised four percent of its US$50,000 goal in a couple of hours, with another 44 days left to go. A pledge of $59 puts you in line for one matte white Lumir C lamp in either style. Additional color options are available at higher pledge tiers.

The company has successfully created working prototypes and attained KC, FCC, CE, and RoHS certificates for the Lumir C. If the product manufacturing goes according the plan, backers can expect shipments to start sometime this July.

Source: Lumir Light

6 comments
JweenyPwee
TIL burning a fuel source that already gives off light...to power an LED light....is "eco friendly."
Martin-tu
Wondering how 'candlepower' relates to Lumens, (or Lux), apparently, one candlepower equals about 12 lux. Meaning that this Lumir do-hicky transforms one (flickering, yellowish, easily blown-out) candle-power into five, (Pure white, steady, scented, relatively safe) candlepower, which is rather neat. At $60 a pop though, unless they're aiming solely at the yuppy market they should maybe address their price.
Toffe Carling
Candle is usually a petrochemical product, not very Eco friendly. A heating candle like in the picture is not common in Africa and generates about 300W of heat. (Equal to same heat in power) So yahh a very inefficient way of lighting any thing. But nice gadget yes.
EyeMars
Toffe Carling is an order of magnitude off though: those small candles produce roughly 30W of heat. The biggest emergency candles I've handled produce about 90W and you wouldn't want those under such a device anyway, as they produce plenty of light on their own. An additive to make candles burn brighter might be a more practical solution than this gadget. Or at the very least, a solution which could generate considerably more generic 12V power from a heating source instead.
HensleyBeuronGarlington
A candle force multiplier. $60 is expensive, but if you learn to make your own candles, this essentially makes your one candle give off the light of about 4-6 candles and is reusable, which isn't horrible. But, outside of home emergencies without backup power, these are too big to be used for camping and such.
Phoghat
cute but silly. there are tons of plans, and a few ready made items for generating electricity from a campfire/cooking fire