Bicycles

Magura unveils wireless dropper post at Eurobike

Magura unveils wireless droppe...
Magura's Vyron eLECT seat post, spotted by Gizmag at Eurobike
Magura's Vyron eLECT seat post, spotted by Gizmag at Eurobike
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Magura's Vyron eLECT seat post, spotted by Gizmag at Eurobike
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Magura's Vyron eLECT seat post, spotted by Gizmag at Eurobike
Along with the air-sprung seat post itself, the Vyron system also includes a handlebar-mounted pushbutton remote
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Along with the air-sprung seat post itself, the Vyron system also includes a handlebar-mounted pushbutton remote
The Vyron seat post's covered power switch and charging port
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The Vyron seat post's covered power switch and charging port
The Vyron can drop by up to 150 mm
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The Vyron can drop by up to 150 mm

Dropper seat posts are becoming increasingly common on mountain bikes – among other things, they allow the rider to drop the saddle down out of the way when they’re adjusting their riding position on steep descents, but then pop it back up again afterwards. They do, however, require yet one more cable to strung along (or inside of) the frame. At this year’s Eurobike show in Germany, Magura has presented an alternative – the Vyron eLECT, which is the world’s first commercially-available wireless dropper seat post.

Along with the air-sprung seat post itself, the Vyron system also includes a handlebar-mounted pushbutton remote. It communicates with the post via the ANT+ wireless protocol, with one button-push dropping the saddle by as much as 150 mm, and then another raising it back to its previous height. A hydraulic clamp holds the post in place.

The remote is powered by a replaceable CR-2032 button battery, while the seat post utilizes a USB-rechargeable NiMH power pack. One charge should reportedly be good for about 400 actuations, and users can still get away with 20 more once the remote has given them a low-battery warning. Recharging from empty takes three hours.

Additionally, in order to save battery life, an accelerometer in the post automatically shuts the power off when the bike hasn’t moved for a while.

Along with the air-sprung seat post itself, the Vyron system also includes a handlebar-mounted pushbutton remote
Along with the air-sprung seat post itself, the Vyron system also includes a handlebar-mounted pushbutton remote

Magura’s eLECT family also includes an electronic suspension fork and rear shock, which users can likewise control using a handlebar remote. If owners of those products don’t want to have multiple remotes on their bar when they buy the Vyron, they can use one of the remotes to control all of the devices.

As an added bonus, because it’s wireless, the Vyron can be swapped between different bikes, as long as they have the same seat post diameter.

While other wireless dropper posts have been seen before in prototype form, Magura’s should be the first to actually reach the market. It will be available starting in November, in 30.9 and 31.6-mm diameters, priced at €400 (about US$455). The seat post and remote have a combined weight of 595 grams.

Source: Magura via Pinkbike

2 comments
zevulon
the dropper seat post is a solution in search of a problem. the current cycle of bicycle innovation has seen a fair number of awesome yet, more or less useless inventions, and this is one.
sk8dad
From experience with various ANT+ devices across several brands, communication loss between sender and receiver occurs randomly for no reason. Most of the time that's tolerable since typical ANT+ devices are data loggers--not the case here. If on a long technical descent, a seatpost refuses to drop or suddenly raises randomly, that would be hugely dangerous. Imagine the potential of face to dirt were the post to malfunction in the middle of a jump. In my view the existing cable or hydraulic bar-mounted trigger technology is more than sufficient, and no drawbacks other than cable/hose routing. Magura has been lagging in component design since their first hydraulic rim brakes circa the 80's. This seem to be yet another poor design on that trajectory.