Electronics

MakerBot unveils three new 3D printers at CES: Giant, compact, and "just right"

MakerBot unveils three new 3D ...
The MakerBot Replicator, the Mini, and the Z18 (left to right)
The MakerBot Replicator, the Mini, and the Z18 (left to right)
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The MakerBot Replicator is the company's prosumer offering, a blend of professional printing at a consumer price
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The MakerBot Replicator is the company's prosumer offering, a blend of professional printing at a consumer price
All three new MakerBot printers feature the new SmartExtruder system
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All three new MakerBot printers feature the new SmartExtruder system
The MakerBot Replicator, the Mini, and the Z18 (left to right)
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The MakerBot Replicator, the Mini, and the Z18 (left to right)
The Makerbot Mini offers a small footprint to accommodate offices and schools
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The Makerbot Mini offers a small footprint to accommodate offices and schools
The Makerbot Replicator Z18 features an impressive print volume and a large price tag
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The Makerbot Replicator Z18 features an impressive print volume and a large price tag
The Makerbot Replicator Z18 printed a full-sized helmet, which was featured at CES
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The Makerbot Replicator Z18 printed a full-sized helmet, which was featured at CES
At CES 2014 today, MakerBot unveiled a new industrial-sized 3D printer, the Z18
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At CES 2014 today, MakerBot unveiled a new industrial-sized 3D printer, the Z18
The Makerbot Replicator Z18 features an impressive print volume
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The Makerbot Replicator Z18 features an impressive print volume

Today at CES saw MakerBot going big, literally, with its announcement of three new 3D printers, the largest being the Replicator Z18 named after its impressive 18-inch print height. Of the two other models announced today, the Replicator upgrades the company’s “prosumer” offering, and the Replicator Mini is designed with students, educators, and workplaces in mind.

The Z18 is designed for oversized industrial prototyping and modeling, with a full build volume of 12 x 12 x 18 in (30.5 x 30.5 x 45.7 cm), for a total build volume of 2,592 cubic inches (.042 cubic m). To further support printing large models, the build plate is extra flat and the print chamber is enclosed and heated. Multiple models can be printed simultaneously.

The Z18 is not yet available, with orders possible in spring of this year (Northern Hemisphere) at an expected price of US$6,499.

As with the Z18, the Replicator Mini is not yet available for purchase. This compact 3D printer is designed to offer quick and easy prints, with “one-touch” printing and a build plate that requires no leveling. Meant to perch on a desk, the Mini has a build volume of 3.9 x 3.9 x 4.9 in (10.0 x 10.0 x 12.5 cm). It will be available to purchase for $1,375.

The MakerBot Replicator is the company's prosumer offering, a blend of professional printing at a consumer price
The MakerBot Replicator is the company's prosumer offering, a blend of professional printing at a consumer price

If these two models represent the Papa Bear and Baby Bear of 3D printers, the last model, the matter-of-factly named Replicator, is the one designed to be "just right." It's the company’s fifth-generation “prosumer” offering, designed for the user who wants a compromise of professional quality and price. While the 4th generation model was confusingly named the Replicator 2, the newest Replicator features an extra 11 percent build volume over its predecessor.

Like its other siblings announced today, the Replicator ships with other upgraded features in addition to its size: the Smart Extruder system which detects when the machine is out of filament and pauses printing, an on-board camera for print monitoring, and app and cloud connectivity

The Replicator is already available for purchase from MakerBot’s website with a price tag of US$2,899, which includes one starter roll of PLA filament.

The Replicator and Replicator Z18 offer 100-micron resolution, while the Mini prints at 200 microns for faster prints.

Also announced for spring is the MakerBot mobile app for remote monitoring of the camera feed and receiving notifications and alerts of print progress.

Source: MakerBot

2 comments
ErinTarn
Wildly expensive for what you get. The 'maker' movement is turning large profits and will soon become just another large business turning out cheap goods for high prices.
asdf
I second that ErinTarn. Let the buyers of makerbots be the buyers of makerbots. If you have money but no time or interest in the technical aspects buying an assembled machine is the way to go. Us reprap DIY printer builders will just keep on our merry way building printers the cheaper, more interesting way :)