Marine

Icona debuts electric, asymmetrical Fibonacci catamaran design

Icona debuts electric, asymmet...
The Icona Fibonacci, a catamaran design out of Turin, Italy
The Icona Fibonacci, a catamaran design out of Turin, Italy
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The Fibonacci is a 55-foot asymmetrical catamaran concept with 400 kW of electric propulsion
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The Fibonacci is a 55-foot asymmetrical catamaran concept with 400 kW of electric propulsion
Asymmetrical staircases recall the Fibonacci sequence
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Asymmetrical staircases recall the Fibonacci sequence
The Icona Fibonacci, a catamaran design out of Turin, Italy
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The Icona Fibonacci, a catamaran design out of Turin, Italy
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Turin's Icona Design last popped up on our radar with an insanely expensive, v8-engined supercar prototype called the Vulcano whose entire bodywork was fashioned from raw titanium. Now, it's back with an electric yacht design inspired by "the numbers of nature."

The Icona Fibonacci is an asymmetrical catamaran. Its chief nod to the Fibonacci sequence would appear to be a pair of sprawling ornamental staircases that wrap themselves around the sides giving access to the flying upper deck and the helm. It might have made more sense to call it the Steinway because its roof lifts off like the lid of a grand piano and the overall shape reminds us more of that than of a seashell.

Still, this 55-footer (16.7 m) is a beauty to look at in the renders, reasonably compact but with defined areas for socializing, sunbathing and below-deck privacy.

The Fibonacci is a 55-foot asymmetrical catamaran concept with 400 kW of electric propulsion
The Fibonacci is a 55-foot asymmetrical catamaran concept with 400 kW of electric propulsion

It would be powered by a pair of 200-kilowatt (270-hp) electric motors, running off a pair of 340-kWh battery packs that make it suitable for weekend cruises with around 12 hours of cruising and another 12 hours of sitting about enjoying yourself. Pure range would be about 150 miles (240 km) when cruising at 10 knots (11.5 mph, 18.5 km/h). Charging could supposedly be accomplished in 20 minutes according to the company, but that seems like a ludicrous miscalculation to us.

Extending the range may be possible using a polymer electrolyte hydrogen fuel cell arrangement that keeps things relatively eco-friendly while seriously upping the energy density – although you'll have to give up some space below deck to go that way.

Will this one make it to the prototype stage, or will it merely serve as a portfolio piece for Icona and its partners Hydrotec, Terra Modena, ASG Power and Studio RPR? It's hard to say, but it sure is a nice thing to look at.

Source: Icona Design

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5 comments
Expanded Viewpoint
Huh, yeah, right, "Eco-friendly" yachts, or anything else for that matter!! Just show me how "electric" power is damaging the environment less than our current energy paradigm. As I have stated many times before, those batteries don't grow on trees or vines, they are made in FACTORIES somewhere, and they come from metals and plastics that were mined by Carbon burning machines and the electricity used to refine them came from burning Carbon based fuels in power plants. All of these "alternative" energy powered cars, trucks and airplanes are just a hoax stemming from people who cannot think very far in a straight line. They seem to think that their "virtue signaling" and political correctness raises them above everybody else and makes them someone to be admired and praised. Baloney. All it does is show up their inability to use logic. Randy
paul314
Is there anything but renders?
Nelson Hyde Chick
A toy for the wealthy as the rest of humanity is left to rot, but it is okay because somehow it is environmentally friendly, right.
ljaques
Yeah, cute, until you get to the "Starting at $63M" bit. ;)
lucius
Ah yes, the obligatory New Atlas ultra-yacht article, keeping the yacht buyers among their readership -- a very exclusive club that probably has zero members -- up to date and well informed.