Medical

Retina-tracking tech claimed to excel at assessing neurological disorders

Retina-tracking tech claimed t...
C. Light is reportedly 120 times more sensitive than pupil-tracking systems, when it comes to measuring eye movement
C. Light is reportedly 120 times more sensitive than pupil-tracking systems, when it comes to measuring eye movement
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C. Light is reportedly 120 times more sensitive than pupil-tracking systems, when it comes to measuring eye movement
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C. Light is reportedly 120 times more sensitive than pupil-tracking systems, when it comes to measuring eye movement
The prototype C. Light system, with the TSLO visible at left – a more compact, streamlined version of the device is in the works
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The prototype C. Light system, with the TSLO visible at left – a more compact, streamlined version of the device is in the works

For some time now, the tracking of eye movements has served as a means of assessing neurological health. A new system is said to do so more precisely than ever, providing highly accurate readings in just 10 seconds.

Developed by Berkeley, California-based C. Light Technologies, the setup is centered around a device known as a Tracking Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (TSLO). Patients simply place their chin upon its chin-rest, then fix their gaze on a visual target.

Over the next 10 seconds, the TSLO records a video of their retina. Because the patient's pupils don't need to be dilated, no eye drops are required, and it doesn't matter if they blink during the procedure.

The prototype C. Light system, with the TSLO visible at left – a more compact, streamlined version of the device is in the works
The prototype C. Light system, with the TSLO visible at left – a more compact, streamlined version of the device is in the works

When the video is subsequently analyzed by the system, eye movements as small as one one-hundredth the width of a human hair are detected via minuscule movements of the retina. In fact, C. Light is reportedly over 120 times more sensitive than traditional technologies, which track eye movement via movements of the pupil.

Artificial intelligence-based algorithms are then used to analyze the movement data, providing a computer-screen readout which indicates if the patient's eye-movement signature matches that of a known disorder.

Plans call for C. Light to initially be used to both assess and track the progression of multiple sclerosis. Down the road, it will also be applied to Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and concussions.

Source: C. Light Technologies

1 comment
guzmanchinky
Excellent, I love technologies that are non invasive like this.