Medical

Wearable tech uses ozone gas to kill bacteria in chronic wounds

Wearable tech uses ozone gas t...
Ozone gas generated by the device kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria via an oxidation process which ruptures the microbes' cell walls
Ozone gas generated by the device kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria via an oxidation process which ruptures the microbes' cell walls
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Ozone gas generated by the device kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria via an oxidation process which ruptures the microbes' cell walls
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Ozone gas generated by the device kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria via an oxidation process which ruptures the microbes' cell walls

For some time now, bacteria-killing ozone gas has been used to help heal chronic wounds such as diabetic skin ulcers. Such treatment could soon be a lot more practical and effective, thanks to an experimental new wearable system.

Ordinarily, ozone therapy patients must travel to clinics, where their antibiotic-resistant wounds are treated by trained technicians. This can be difficult for patients living in remote areas, with limited mobility, or who are located in regions where clinicians are in short supply. Additionally, not only do the patients have to wait around at the clinic while being treated, but their treatment stops as soon as the session ends.

Led by Asst. Prof. Rahim Rahimi, a team at Indiana's Purdue University set out to address those limitations.

In the course of doing so, the researchers created a prototype portable, wearable setup. It consists of a breathable patch that is temporarily adhered to the skin over top of the wound, and which is linked by a silicone hose to a compact, belt-worn, battery-powered ozone-generating device.

"The ozone gas is transported to the skin surface at the wound site and provides a targeted approach for wound healing," says Rahimi. "Our innovation is small and simple to use for patients at home."

Animal studies are now being planned, after which clinical trials on humans may commence.

The research is described in a paper that was recently published in the journal Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology.

Source: Purdue University

3 comments
Haresh
I have used Ozone in my practice for 45 years and have had 90% success rate in healing of chronic wounds. This is a great invention and it’s portable. I would recommend it to my patients once it’s available.
buzzclick
I hear you Doc. I have a friend with stubborn ulcer complications from diabetes. The sooner this kind of portable treatment becomes available the better.
Signguy
Funny; I had a Air Purifier that used Ozone (& ions) to clean the air like Nature does, but the radicals said it was "Dangerous"!