Bicycles

Mercedes-AMG draws on its GT sports car to create the Rotwild GT S mountain bike

The Rotwild GT S and its four-wheeled inspiration
The Rotwild GT S and its four-wheeled inspiration
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The Rotwild GT S and its four-wheeled inspiration
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The Rotwild GT S and its four-wheeled inspiration
Only 100 Rotwild GT S bikes are being made
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Only 100 Rotwild GT S bikes are being made
The Rotwild GT S features Crankbrothers Cobalt 11 29-inch rims
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The Rotwild GT S features Crankbrothers Cobalt 11 29-inch rims
The Mercedes-AMG GT and the Rotwild GT S share the same color scheme
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The Mercedes-AMG GT and the Rotwild GT S share the same color scheme
The Rotwild GT S handles bumps via a 100-mm ThirtyThree fork from Italian brand Formula
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The Rotwild GT S handles bumps via a 100-mm ThirtyThree fork from Italian brand Formula
The Rotwild GT S features Continental Race King RaceSport tires
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The Rotwild GT S features Continental Race King RaceSport tires
The Rotwild GT S features a carbon Pro Tharsis XC handlebar and seat post
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The Rotwild GT S features a carbon Pro Tharsis XC handlebar and seat post
The Rotwild GT S features Formula R1 Racing FCS hydraulic disc brakes
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The Rotwild GT S features Formula R1 Racing FCS hydraulic disc brakes
The Rotwild GT S features Shimano XTR Di2 electronic shifting
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The Rotwild GT S features Shimano XTR Di2 electronic shifting
The Rotwild GT S features Shimano XTR Di2 derailleurs
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The Rotwild GT S features Shimano XTR Di2 derailleurs
The Rotwild GT S has a 2 x 11 drivetrain
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The Rotwild GT S has a 2 x 11 drivetrain
There's no word on the total weight of the Rotwild GT S
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There's no word on the total weight of the Rotwild GT S

Usually when we hear about high-end automakers dabbling in bicycle design, the result is a road bike – recent examples have included bikes made in collaboration with companies such as McLaren, Jaguar, Aston Martin and Lamborghini. Joining the likes of Porsche, however, Mercedes‑AMG has decided to go with a mountain bike. The sports car and performance brand within Mercedes-Benz recently joined forces with German bicycle manufacturer Rotwild, to create the limited-edition Rotwild GT S.

Said to be inspired by the Mercedes-AMG GT automobile, the hard-tail GT S features a monocoque high-modulus carbon fiber frame. Carbon also finds its way into the Pro Tharsis XC handlebar and seat post, the Ergon SRX saddle, the Crankbrothers Cobalt 11 29-inch rims, and the water bottle cage.

Bumps are handled by a 100-mm ThirtyThree fork from Italian brand Formula, while shifting is taken care of electronically via a Shimano XTR Di2 2 x 11 drivetrain. Other specs include Formula R1 Racing FCS hydraulic disc brakes, Continental Race King RaceSport tires, and Crankbrothers Candy 3 clipless pedals. There's no word on total weight.

There's no word on the total weight of the Rotwild GT S
There's no word on the total weight of the Rotwild GT S

Also included with the bike is a package including a Thule protective transport case, a Topeak shock pump, and various other Topeak tools contained in a rescue kit.

According to Mercedes' parent company Daimler, the GT S was developed using feedback from the AMG Rotwild MTB racing team. And as for it being inspired by the Mercedes-AMG GT – what exactly does that mean? Well, it's partly a focus on "dynamism, lightweight construction, design and comfort." The bike also shares the car's carbon black and solarbeam (yellowy-gold) color scheme.

And then there's the fact that both vehicles are expensive. Only 100 Rotwild GT S bikes are being made, each one selling for €9,990 (about US$10,870).

Mercedes‑AMG and Rotwild have produced a mountain bike together before, incidentally, in the form of 2013's full-suspension R.X45 AMG.

Sources: Daimler, Rotwild

2 comments
PaleDale
I wish they wouldn't do this. No serious mountain biker would waste $11K on that. The wheels are rubbish and it doesn't even have a dropper seat post. The Di2 is the only decent product on the bike.
Josh Kahan
what's really cool about all this crap is that back in the 1930s thru 50s, car manufacturers were making bicycles because a) they had the manufacturing know-how and capacity, b) it was good marketing , and C) to a limited extent, they could try out some gearing technology and other construction methods. I guess history is repeating itself. Many car manufacturers (especially the "high end" ones) are doing this again because a) they have the know-how and capacity in specialty manufacturing (carbon fiber), b) it's good marketing, and d) they are again trying out new technologies (especially with electric drive train matters - though not in this particular case).