Military

ARCAS sight turns an assault rifle into a combat information center

ARCAS sight turns an assault r...
ARCAS being used with the wired eyepiece
ARCAS being used with the wired eyepiece
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ARCAS allows a rifle to shoot around corners
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ARCAS allows a rifle to shoot around corners
ARCAS being used with the wired eyepiece
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ARCAS being used with the wired eyepiece

Elbit Systems has developed a new AI-powered rifle scope called the Assault Rifle Combat Application System (ARCAS) that turns a soldier's assault rifle into a portable combat information center, as well as allowing the users to shoot around corners.

There was a time when the most high-tech data system on a rifle was a pair of iron sights that let a soldier know if the weapon was pointing at the right spot. Today, telescopic sights have become standard equipment, as have night vision systems, and an increasing array of accessories.

ACRAS is designed to attach to existing rifles, with the AI-powered computer installed in the weapon's forward grip and an electro-optical (EO) sight slung under the barrel. The computer gathers data from the sight, tactical information transmitted from the combat unit's command-and-control system and other ARCAS devices, and mechanical diagnostic data from the rifle itself.

ARCAS allows a rifle to shoot around corners
ARCAS allows a rifle to shoot around corners

Once processed, the EO sight's field of view and other information is fed to the soldier through an eyepiece on the scope or a wireless version on the helmet in an augmented reality overlay. Using this data, the user has real-time readouts day or night of target range, how to correct for windage and distance, the presence of other weapons' fire, video motion detection, friend or foe identification, and the nature of mechanical problems with the rifle.

If that isn't enough, the video system also allows the user to shoot around corners, from the hip, and to adjust the accuracy of the weapon without having to fire a round. Control of the unit is through a joystick button on the forward grip or a gamer-style Graphical User Interface. The basic ARCAS comes with thermal or low-light sight, but can be modified to run third-party applications.

"ARCAS is another important building block in our advanced portfolio of solutions for dismounted soldiers," says Oren Sabag, General Manager, Elbit Systems ISTAR. "The development of this new solution is part of our continuous effort and R&D investments aimed at enabling a step-change in the effectiveness and survivability of infantry and Special Forces."

Source: Elbit Systems

5 comments
5 comments
Michael son of Lester
These are wonderful until the opposition uses an EMP Weapon that is powerful enough to overcome the electronic hardening built into the system and fries the electronics.

https://www.airuniversity.af.edu/Portals/10/ASPJ/journals/Chronicles/apjemp.pdf
Expanded Viewpoint
Or maybe a super bright and focused down strobe light would burn out the optical sensor chip. Laser light could do that too. Come to think about it, you wouldn't have to burn the sensors out, just overload them for a few seconds to cause enough confusion to make the enemy vulnerable. If they are dependent upon that sight, then taking it away from them leaves them naked in the world.
Cryptonoetic
All this for a measly hundred grand a pop.
noteugene
Lester's right, along with frying the electronics of ships, tanks, planes, submarines, communications gear and everything else connected to electronics. 1 dirty EMP burst could destroy most of our country, not just our Defense agencies. There are utility, communication & shipping concerns to consider. Were I in a leadership position, I'd direct all of our resources on EMP defense. We have enough electronic gear as is. We need to protect it. Our country as we know it could end 5 minutes from now.
Nelson Hyde Chick
It is so encouraging to know we are working on more efficient ways to kill one another.