Physics

MIT physicists build world's first fermion microscope

Scientists at Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a microscope that they claim is able to image the fundamental particles that make up all matter in the universe
Scientists at Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a microscope that they claim is able to image the fundamental particles that make up all matter in the universe
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Graduate student Lawrence Cheuk adjusts the optics setup for laser cooling of sodium atoms.
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Graduate student Lawrence Cheuk adjusts the optics setup for laser cooling of sodium atoms.
Scientists at Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a microscope that they claim is able to image the fundamental particles that make up all matter in the universe
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Scientists at Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a microscope that they claim is able to image the fundamental particles that make up all matter in the universe
Sodium atoms diffuse out of an oven to form an atomic beam, which is then slowed and trapped using laser light.
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Sodium atoms diffuse out of an oven to form an atomic beam, which is then slowed and trapped using laser light.
A Quantum gas microscope for fermionic atoms. The atoms, potassium-40, are cooled during imaging by laser light, allowing thousands of photons to be collected by the microscope.
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A Quantum gas microscope for fermionic atoms. The atoms, potassium-40, are cooled during imaging by laser light, allowing thousands of photons to be collected by the microscope.
The Fermi gas microscope group: (from left) graduate students Katherine Lawrence and Melih Okan, postdoc Thomas Lompe, graduate student Matt Nichols, Professor Martin Zwierlein, and graduate student Lawrence Cheuk.
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The Fermi gas microscope group: (from left) graduate students Katherine Lawrence and Melih Okan, postdoc Thomas Lompe, graduate student Matt Nichols, Professor Martin Zwierlein, and graduate student Lawrence Cheuk.

Researchers working at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) claim to have created a method tobetter observe fermions – the sub-atomic building blocks of matter – byconstructing a microscope capable of viewing them in groups of a thousand at atime. A laser technique is used to herd the fermions into a viewing area andthen freeze them in place so all of the capturedparticles can be imaged simultaneously.

In the entire knownuniverse, there are only two types of particles: fermions and bosons. In simpleterms, fermions are all the particles that make up matter (for example, electrons), and bosons are all the particles that carry force (for example, photons).

Fermions include electrons,neutrons, quarks, protons, and atoms consisting of an odd number of any or all of theseelementary particles. However, due to the strange (and not completelyunderstood) nature of these particles in regard to their quantum spin states,scientists often opt to employ gases of ultra-cold fermionic atoms as proxiesfor other fermions.

Sodium atoms diffuse out of an oven to form an atomic beam, which is then slowed and trapped using laser light.
Sodium atoms diffuse out of an oven to form an atomic beam, which is then slowed and trapped using laser light.

Over the last two decades,physicists studying ultracold atomic gases of boson particles – such as photons– have been able to do so relatively easily because bosons can occupy the samequantum state in boundless numbers. Fermions, however, are much harder tomanipulate for imaging, as they are unable to be held in the same quantum statein large numbers and are very much more difficultto reduce to the temperatures required to slow them down enough to view them.

Physicists at HarvardUniversity successfully created a boson microscope that could resolve individualbosons in an optical lattice as far back as 2009. Similarly, in 2010, the MaxPlanck Institute of Quantum Optics also developed a second boson microscope.And, though these microscopes exposed the behavior of bosons, theircounterparts – fermions – remained elusive without an equivalent fermionmicroscope. .

"We wanted to do what these groupshad done for bosons, but for fermions," said Zwierlein says. "And it turned outit was much harder for fermions, because the atoms we use are not so easilycooled. So we had to find a new way to cool them while looking at them."

What is required to studyfermions is a way to reduce their temperature, and thereforetheir movement, to a point low enough to image them. However, even techniques thatresulted in the first ever laboratory realization of Bose-Einstein condensationin 1995 (which resulted in a Nobel Prize in 2001), or later work that saw laserscool atoms to a few ten-thousandths of a degree above absolute zero areinsufficient to achieve the cooling required to image fermion atoms.

To overcome this problem,the MIT researchers initially created an optical lattice using laser beams toform an arrangement of light "wells" which could magnetically trap and hold asingle fermion in place (a technique similar to that used by the University of California to capture cesium atoms and image rotons). Applying a number of stages of laser temperaturereduction, and more evaporative cooling of the gas (in this case, potassium gas), the atoms were cooled tojust above absolute zero which was cold enough to hold individual fermions inplace on the optical lattice.

As the fermions move to this lower energy state, they also release photons of light which can then be captured by the microscope and used to locate a fermion’s exact position within the lattice at an accuracy level greater than the wavelength of light.

"That means I know where they are, and I can maybe move them around with a little tweezer to any location, and arrange them in any pattern I’d like," said Martin Zwierlein, a professor of physics at MIT and a member of the team working on the project.

Unfortunately, this stability was tenuous because – when light was shone upon the atoms to view them – individual photons wereable to knock them out of place.

A Quantum gas microscope for fermionic atoms. The atoms, potassium-40, are cooled during imaging by laser light, allowing thousands of photons to be collected by the microscope.
A Quantum gas microscope for fermionic atoms. The atoms, potassium-40, are cooled during imaging by laser light, allowing thousands of photons to be collected by the microscope.

The team resolved this bycleverly employing a two laser beam approach where beams of differingfrequencies were used to alter the fermion atom’s energy state. By simultaneously firingthe two beams at the atom so that one beam frequency was absorbed by theparticle, it would emit a corresponding photon in response. This, in turn,forced the particle into a lower energy state, thus cooling it further byreducing its excitation levels.

The upshot of this research,according to the team, is that the high-resolution image capture of more than1,000 fermionic atoms all together at the one time will help improve ourfundamental understanding of these elusive particles. As electrons are alsofermions, it is hoped that this information may eventually aid research intohigh-temperature superconductors, with their inherent advantages of lossless energy transport and the developmentof quantum computer systems.

"The Fermi gas microscope,together with the ability to position atoms at will, might be an important steptoward the realization of a quantum computer based on fermions," said Zwierlein. "One would thus harness the power of the very same intricate quantum rules thatso far hamper our understanding of electronic systems."

The results of this researchhave recently been published in the journal PhysicalReview Letters

Source: MIT

4 comments
DurasnoPeach
Please excuse this question as I am only an egg. Isn't Alchemy the ability to position atoms at will to change one element into another?
Kevin Ritchey
It might be an interesting thought to perceive what a computer might look like based on the power requirements necessary to get the particles to remain stable enough to utilize in a CPU-type of arrangement. You are back to huge computers that aren't very practical, at least for the foreseeable future.
Douglas Bennett Rogers
Molecules and atoms have spin n*1/2 and follow a Maxwell Boltzmann distribution. Electron have spin 1/2 and follow a Fermi Dirac distribution. Photons have spin 1 and follow a Bose Einstein distribution. The atoms in question must be ionized and acting like electrons. The goal of alchemy is to turn base metals into gold. This can be done with a particle accelerator but is not cost effective. A quantum computer is like a fusion reactor. It has a large minimum size but scales non linearly.
attoman
Fermions are particles such as electrons with spin 1/2, 3/2 or any multiple and includes protons and atoms so for instance hydrogen with a spin of 1/2 is a Fermion. Bosons have integer spins 1,2, and so on eg. two spin 1/2 protons such as helium atoms. Electron and Helium microscopes have been around for a very long time. Indeed careful reading of the article makes clear that the microscope involved is an optical microscope seeing a cloud of fermions. This article might be a breakthrough (or not) although as the researcher himself said ".......might be an important step toward the realization of a quantum computer based on fermions......." but not an important microscope.
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