Mobile Technology

Linux-based tablet aims to bridge mobile and desktop user experience

Linux-based tablet aims to bri...
The JingPad A1 tablet will run a slick Linux-based operating system where desktop and mobile apps can be had
The JingPad A1 tablet will run a slick Linux-based operating system where desktop and mobile apps can be had
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The JingPad A1 tablet will run a slick Linux-based operating system where desktop and mobile apps can be had
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The JingPad A1 tablet will run a slick Linux-based operating system where desktop and mobile apps can be had
The JingPad A1 features a stylish glass back and 11-inch AMOLED display out front
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The JingPad A1 features a stylish glass back and 11-inch AMOLED display out front
Screen resolution is reported to be 2,369 x 1,728 pixels
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Screen resolution is reported to be 2,369 x 1,728 pixels
Developers can code on the move thanks to support for apps like Terminal and VS Code
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Developers can code on the move thanks to support for apps like Terminal and VS Code
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China's JingLing recently introduced a Linux-based operating system called JingOS that's designed specifically for mobile devices. And now the company has revealed plans to launch a consumer-level tablet running that operating system on Indiegogo in June.

The JingPad A1 sports an 11-inch AMOLED display panel at 2,368 x 1,728 resolution and 4:3 aspect, with support for 109 percent of the NTSC color space and a screen-to-body ratio of (almost) 90 percent.

It will run on an ARM-based architecture, and though no specifics have been given TuxPhones reports that an 8-core Unisoc Tiger processor will run the show with the help of a PowerVR GM 9446 graphics unit. We do know that the tablet will come with 6 GB of RAM and 128 GB of storage though.

The A1 is expected to be 6.7 mm thin (0.26 in) and tip the scales at 500 g (17.6 oz). It will have support for 5G mobile comms, and its 8,000-mAh battery is reckoned good for up to 10 hours per charge. You can expect a single 16-megapixel camera module around back and a 8-MP webcam to the front, there's a detachable keyboard rocking a trackpad inspired by Apple Magic Keyboard for iPad, and a stylus input called the JingPad Pencil will be included in the package, with 4.096 pressure levels.

Screen resolution is reported to be 2,369 x 1,728 pixels
Screen resolution is reported to be 2,369 x 1,728 pixels

The device is claimed to be the first consumer-level Linux tablet, but we have seen something similar from Canonical before called the Ubuntu Edge (which sadly remained a concept after failing to raise production funds), and Android itself is based on a Linux kernel.

That said, the A1 will come with the startup's JingOS custom distro pre-installed, a Linux-based operating system that's been optimized for touch-enabled devices – to "perfectly combine the mobile experience and desktop experience."

Developers can code on the move thanks to support for apps like Terminal and VS Code
Developers can code on the move thanks to support for apps like Terminal and VS Code

The tablet could prove a big draw for developers who want to code while on the move, with VS Code and Terminal among the tools supported. And it seems like JingLing is aiming for a best of both worlds app experience too, making desktop apps like WPS Office, GIMP, Telegram and more available alongside Android apps like Netflix, YouTube and Spotify – though there's no mention at this point whether there will be full access to the Google Store.

As of writing, the JingPad A1 tablet looks to be very much a work in progress. Expect more details in the run up to the Indiegogo campaign in June.

Source: JingLing

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3 comments
paul314
I hope it's hackable. Because the difference between that an a light laptop isn't much.
Daishi
I used to know a few IT professionals that used Linux desktops ages ago but it seems like all of those people have mostly moved to OSX. The only people I can think of using Linux as a desktop these days are the people using Chromebooks and android tablets/phones as primary computing devices. With that said there are a couple existing desktop orientated Linux distros listed on distrowatch that look interesting. Even if they are hard set on building a custom UI for the tablet use-case I don't see a reason they have to create another distro instead of just shipping a new DE for an existing one.
christopher
Google Store ... I bet 50% of readers (the privacy/security mob) here are thinking "Yay - No Google Store" and the other 50% thinking "I hope it gets Google Store"