Crowdfunding

  • Have you ever browsed through crowdfunding campaign pages online and wished you could try before you pledge? That's the idea behind Woondering, a pop-up shop coming to London's Brick Lane next month.
  • We’ve been singing the praises of the Nintendo Switch for years, but there are a couple of little things that could use some improvement. Now, a new accessory fills one of those holes – the Genki Covert Dock, a small device that charges the console and lets players plug it into TVs on the go.
  • ​We've seen mermaid-type monofins before, and we've also seen so-called underwater scooters. A group of US/UK entrepreneurs has gone and combined the two, in the form of a monofin that gives swimmers an electric boost with each kick.
  • For every truly groundbreaking concept there are a hundred others that should have stayed as smudges on a whiteboard. Since the flow of bad ideas never seems to end, New Atlas once again picks through the cream of the crap to highlight some more of the worst Kickstarters we’ve seen recently.
  • Imagine if, after World War 2, the Germans, English, and Italians could all agree on a vehicle design concept. Then, to make it happen, they went to Estonia and made a prototype. This might seem like an alternate universe kind of story, but it’s (with some delay) what happened with the Nobe 100.
  • Misty Robotics reckons it's arrived at the point when its personal robot will go from development dream to widespread adoption. The bot has been designed to be relatively inexpensive and easy to access for those new to programming, while capable enough for seasoned roboticists to experiment with.
  • The Pleistocene Park project is aiming to rebuild a lost Ice Age ecosystem in Siberia, and its directors, Sergey and Nikita Zimov, say it could help slow the effects of climate change. Now, the initiative is running a crowdfunding campaign to help transport a new herd of animals to the park.
  • ​A couple of years ago, design firm Carlo Ratti Associati showcased a system in which drones were used to draw images on walls. It was very clever, but perhaps not something that could become a commercial product. The company's Scribit wall-drawing robot, however, is intended to be just that.
  • ​According to its creators, the currently-crowdfunding PocketSprite is the world’s smallest playable emulation device. It isn't just tiny, though – it plays all Game Boy, Game Boy Color, Sega Master System, and Game Gear games, plus users can upload other games via Wi-Fi.
  • ​A little over a year after launching a crowdfunding campaign to develop a new electric city car, Sweden's Uniti has unveiled the One. There's been a range increase, and the top speed has been bumped up, but it was the odd-looking games controller steering system that stole the show.​
  • UK singer/songwriter Pete Roe has announced a follow up to the Submarine pickup. Where the first model added extra dimension to two strings only, the Pro's six magnetic coils can pick up signals from each of a guitar's six strings. The player uses switches to determine the route of the signals.​
  • The lightweight LMX 161-H is an electric motorcycle styled after downhill bicycles, fusing elements from both worlds. Initially designed for extreme off-road use, the two-wheeler is now the subject of crowdfunding campaign in search of the resources required to homologate it for the street.