Motorcycles

Yamaha powers up second generation electric trials bike

Yamaha powers up second genera...
Trials rider Kuroyama Kenichi will compete in the Trial World Championship with the TY-E 2.0
Trials rider Kuroyama Kenichi will compete in the Trial World Championship with the TY-E 2.0
View 6 Images
The Yamaha TY-E 2.0 electric trials bike will make its public debut at the 49th Tokyo Motorcycle Show in June
1/6
The Yamaha TY-E 2.0 electric trials bike will make its public debut at the 49th Tokyo Motorcycle Show in June
Yamaha has developed a new Li-ion battery unit for the TY-E 2.0 electric trials bike, which is reported to offer 2.5x more capacity thank its predecessor
2/6
Yamaha has developed a new Li-ion battery unit for the TY-E 2.0 electric trials bike, which is reported to offer 2.5x more capacity thank its predecessor
Yamaha engineers have rearranged the layout for the power unit and battery "to achieve a significantly lower center of gravity compared to the previous model"
3/6
Yamaha engineers have rearranged the layout for the power unit and battery "to achieve a significantly lower center of gravity compared to the previous model"
The TY-E 2.0 features the same kind of flywheel and mechanical wet, multi-plate clutch as the 2018 original, but Yamaha has refined the power unit for improved response
4/6
The TY-E 2.0 features the same kind of flywheel and mechanical wet, multi-plate clutch as the 2018 original, but Yamaha has refined the power unit for improved response
The TY-E 2.0 features a new carbon fiber reinforced polymer monocoque frame
5/6
The TY-E 2.0 features a new carbon fiber reinforced polymer monocoque frame
Trials rider Kuroyama Kenichi will compete in the Trial World Championship with the TY-E 2.0
6/6
Trials rider Kuroyama Kenichi will compete in the Trial World Championship with the TY-E 2.0
View gallery - 6 images

Motorcycle trials are the ultimate test of pure skill and fine control, and riders generally hop on rocks, power up near vertical hills or roll over narrow logs on lightweight two-stroke bikes, but powerful electric drivetrains are making a quiet bid for recognition.

Yamaha has now followed the launch of the TY-E electric trials bike in 2018 with a second generation prototype, which the company says has been designed to offer riders more fun than they can have on the two-stroke machines typically seen – and heard – in trials events, by tapping into appealing characteristics of electric drivetrains like powerful torque and fast acceleration.

The TY-E 2.0 is built around a new monocoque frame design with a X-shaped rib that makes use of composite laminates to keep things light and rigid, with the bike tipping the scales at somewhere slightly north of 70 kg (~154 lb).

Engineers have revised the layout of the electric power unit and battery for a lower center of gravity than seen on the 2018 model, and that Li-ion battery is reported to have 2.5x more capacity than before with only a 20 percent increase in weight.

The TY-E 2.0 features a new carbon fiber reinforced polymer monocoque frame
The TY-E 2.0 features a new carbon fiber reinforced polymer monocoque frame

As before, the setup runs a flywheel and a mechanical wet, multi-plate clutch but the power unit has been tweaked for better response and improved traction.

The only other key detail that Yamaha has shared at this point is a minimum ground clearance of 340 mm (13.4 in), though more information will likely be available when the TY-E 2.0 is displayed at the company booth at the 49th Tokyo Motorcycle Show from March 25. After that, the electric trials bike will be entered in select rounds of the 2022 Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme Trial World Championship from June.

Source: Yamaha

View gallery - 6 images
9 comments
9 comments
guzmanchinky
Yes! Bring on the ecycles!
Chuck
Cool bike but why a clutch? Electric bikes don’t need a clutch.
vince
Wish had this when I competed in Rocky Mountain Trials Association in the 70's and 80's. Darn nice. 156 lbs is incredible. My old Cota 350's were about 235 lbs. Dry.
Nelson Hyde Chick
Chuck, a clutch is needed to modulate power delivery, which is very important on trial bikes.
Peter Forte
I was first exposed to trials riding, reading of the exploits of the incomparable Sammy Miller on his, I think it was a Bultaco, or a Montesa.
A trials bike powered by an electric motor would pose huge problems of controllability, with the instant torque available. A clutch is essential.
Catweazle
I think I can claim to be one of the first few motorcyclists in the world to ride an electric trials bike, back in around 1964 AFAIK.
At the Blackpool (UK) motorcycle show electrical component supplier Joseph Lucas (AKA "The Prince of Darkness" because of their somewhat unreliable lamps) had a stand with two trials bikes, a Greeves Scottish and a BSA C15T, fitted with car batteries and electric motors and a small trials section.
Control was basic, the twistgrip was connected to an on/off switch.
Things have come on quite a bit since then!
ljaques
That looks like a 0.077 ton of fun! I wish small street bikes could be held to that weight.
doc
What they DONT mention is the Price
Idunno
Awesome story by Catweazle. I have a Oset 24.0R, which is an electric trials bike. Very basic. 1400 watt motor, 48v 20ah battery. Top speed 21mph. Run time about 1.25 hours. 107 lbs. The 90kg (?) weight limitation is due to the suspension spring rates, not the actual component limitation. $4400, I got mine used. I'm sure it's very limited compared to a legit trials machine, but it's my first foray into trials, and it's one of the most rewarding toys I've ever had. Very old tech, and expensive for what it is, but there simply aren't other real alternatives. Sur Ron is very different but same price and way more power. Still love my Oset!