Digital Cameras

Orbi Prime records 4K 360-degree video with stylish shades

Orbi Prime records 4K 360-degr...
The Orbi Prime is the first 360-degree camera rig embedded in a pair of sunglasses
The Orbi Prime is the first 360-degree camera rig embedded in a pair of sunglasses
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The Orbi Prime is the first 360-degree camera rig embedded in a pair of sunglasses
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The Orbi Prime is the first 360-degree camera rig embedded in a pair of sunglasses
The Orbi Prime glasses are durable, water-resistant, have polarized, adaptive lenses and come with a detachable safety strap
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The Orbi Prime glasses are durable, water-resistant, have polarized, adaptive lenses and come with a detachable safety strap
The Orbi Prime captures 4K video at 30 fps, thanks to four HD cameras: two in front and two in back
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The Orbi Prime captures 4K video at 30 fps, thanks to four HD cameras: two in front and two in back
Connecting to a smartphone via Wi-Fi, the Orbi app allows users to watch, edit and share their videos to social media
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Connecting to a smartphone via Wi-Fi, the Orbi app allows users to watch, edit and share their videos to social media

With devices like the Nico360, 360-degree cameras are getting smaller and more portable, but the Orbi Prime looks like one you might forget you're even using. Packed inside a pair of stylish sunglasses are four HD cameras that can capture up to 90 minutes of 360-degree video, leaving the wearer's hands free for biking, paddling, climbing or whatever other capture-worthy activity they're doing.

Extremophiles looking to capture their outdoor adventures in 360 degrees are spoiled for choice: options like the Kodak PixPro 4KVR360 or Samsung's Gear 360 are decent and affordable enough 360 cameras for enthusiasts, while professionals might prefer to fork out US$15 grand for the beefy GoPro Odyssey rig. Of course, if aerial 360 videos are more your jam, drones like the Janus and the Exo360 have you covered.

But Orbi Prime is the first time we've seen the tech incorporated into a pair of smart glasses. The specs feature two 1080p cameras on the front, one on either temple, plus two more on the tip of each arm, facing backwards and outwards. All together, they can capture 4K video at 30 fps for up to 90 minutes, stabilized in real-time to help smooth things out. While the field of view is a full 360 degrees horizontally, only 300 degrees of the upper hemisphere is captured, which means glancing up in a video will grant a view of the sky, but look down and you'll be staring off into a deep, dark void.

Connecting to a smartphone via Wi-Fi, the Orbi app allows users to watch, edit and share their videos to social media
Connecting to a smartphone via Wi-Fi, the Orbi app allows users to watch, edit and share their videos to social media

Power comes from a pair of 1,000-mAh batteries, rechargeable via micro USB, and also onboard is a reasonable 128 GB of storage space. The specs connect to smartphones over Wi-Fi, where an app allows users to watch, edit and share their videos. Given their outdoorsy nature, the glasses themselves are water-resistant, come with a detachable safety strap to keep them firmly on your noggin, and the lenses are polarized and adaptive. They are shades, after all.

The Indiegogo campaign for the Orbi Prime is wrapping up very soon, but the specs are still available for a pledge of US$229, which also includes a charging case, safety strap, USB connector and a lens cloth. If all goes to plan, the glasses should ship in August 2017.

Check out the campaign video below.

Source: Orbi

The First 360º Video Recording Eyewear - Orbi Prime

4 comments
guzmanchinky
Wow, the idea of being able to share into a VR headset is seriously future.
Milton
I need to see a real video that I can view on my Google Cardboard before I am convinced.
SaysMe
You notice not one video from the glasses them self? Vaporware...
larryasilva
PRODUCT FEATURE SUGGESTION... Design a "hinge" for these sunglasses so that the lenses can be lifted up when going indoors....and allow video recording to continue. I like to keep recording wherever I go. Taking the sunglasses off when going indoors means video recording must cease.....and I have to put the glasses somewhere.