Outdoors

Chuck Bucket aims to simplify the hauling of outdoor gear

Chuck Bucket aims to simplify the hauling of outdoor gear
The Chuck Bucket is presently on Kickstarter
The Chuck Bucket is presently on Kickstarter
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The Chuck Bucket reportedly weighs 37 lb (17 kg), and can carry up to 100 lb (45 kg)
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The Chuck Bucket reportedly weighs 37 lb (17 kg), and can carry up to 100 lb (45 kg)
The Chuck Bucket is presently on Kickstarter
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The Chuck Bucket is presently on Kickstarter
The Chuck Bucket tilts back for access to the vehicle's tailgate
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The Chuck Bucket tilts back for access to the vehicle's tailgate
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While there a variety of systems for carrying gear on your car, most of them involve leaning in, reaching up, and messing around with a carrier that's mounted on the roof. The Chuck Bucket is made to be simpler, as it just sits on the back.

Manufactured by Salt Lake City-based startup Chuck Rack, the Chuck Bucket consists of a polymer-coated 5052 aluminum box, an adjustable-height steel mast which telescopes up from behind the box, and a rectangular "top ring" which is attached to the top of the mast.

The whole rig quickly mounts on the vehicle's trailer hitch via a single pin, and can be tilted back 35 degrees for tailgate access.

To utilize the Chuck Bucket, users just open up the hinged front section of the ring; load their skis, snowboards, golf clubs or whatnot into the box; secure that cargo to the mast with a bungee cord or cam buckle strap; then close and latch the ring. According to the designers, the cargo will stay securely in place while the user is driving, and it won't bounce out of the box when the vehicle goes over bumps in the road.

The Chuck Bucket tilts back for access to the vehicle's tailgate
The Chuck Bucket tilts back for access to the vehicle's tailgate

A removable rubber pad on the bottom of the box helps to protect both the box and its contents, while also minimizing clattering noises. Additionally, drainage holes at each corner of the box keep it from accumulating rain or melted snow.

The entire setup reportedly weighs 37 lb (17 kg), and can carry up to 100 lb (45 kg).

Should you be interested, the Chuck Bucket is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign. Assuming it reaches production, a pledge of US$249 will get you one – the planned retail price is $420.

Sources: Kickstarter, Chuck Bucket

View gallery - 3 images
7 comments
7 comments
Bodger
Turning your everyday car into the world's smallest and least practical pickup truck?
Michael son of Lester
I would consider buying one because having one would simplify taking my clubs to the golf course. The only problem is that it would obstruct the rear licence plate on my SUV just like it would on many others, and that's a traffic offence.
Brian M
or how to get pulled over by the traffic police, in many areas this would be totally illegal if the box or what it holds obstructs the vehicle registration plate (even partially).

Someone at Chuck Bucket needs to do their research properly!
RAG
Put wheels on it so you can take it in a hotel room overnight while traveling
ljaques
Great idea, Chuck, except for the obstruction problem. Solution: Drill 4 holes at license plate mounting dimensions in the back of the bucket and install rivnuts, then bolt the license plate to the bucket. Cost: $4 to $40 (nuts alone, or tool purchase) One question: What is the percentage of everyday driven cars with receiver mounts connected to the rear?
If I had the need, I'd build my own, though. ChaCHING!
GregVoevodsky
Wow a metal box that tilts for $420?! I grew up taking ski buses in Sun Valley Idaho. All you did as a 12 year old was pick up your skies and drop them into a metal box that ran down the side of the bus and climbed onboard with your poles. To think, I could get a plastic garbage can strapped onto my SUV, dump in a bunch of skies and strap them for alot less. Save your time put the skies inside or a cheep roof rack. Dumb ideas that solve no real problems. Good luck with that. $50 maybe if it worked at best.
Bodger
I’d get one if I could use it on my bicycle.