Outdoors

Together at last - the fishing rod and the rifle

Together at last - the fishing...
The Pack-Rifle converts from a .22 caliber rifle to a fishing rod
The Pack-Rifle converts from a .22 caliber rifle to a fishing rod
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The Pack-Rifle functioning as a fishing rod
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The Pack-Rifle functioning as a fishing rod
The Pack-Rifle breaks down into two pieces for easy carrying
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The Pack-Rifle breaks down into two pieces for easy carrying
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The Pack-Rifle on the way to becoming a fishing rod
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The Pack-Rifle on the way to becoming a fishing rod
The Pack-Rifle in fishing rod mode
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The Pack-Rifle in fishing rod mode
The Pack-Rifle in fishing rod mode
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The Pack-Rifle in fishing rod mode
The Pack-Rifle is compatible with adjustable peep sights
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The Pack-Rifle is compatible with adjustable peep sights
The Pack-Rifle is a .22 caliber rifle
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The Pack-Rifle is a .22 caliber rifle
The Pack-Rifle in rifle mode
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The Pack-Rifle in rifle mode
The Pack-Rifle converts from a .22 caliber rifle to a fishing rod
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The Pack-Rifle converts from a .22 caliber rifle to a fishing rod
View gallery - 10 images

Takedown rifles that can be broken down for easy transport and storage fit the bill nicely for hunting trips, as they don't add a lot of weight or take up a lot of space in a backpack. A fishing rod to provide a more tranquil way of rustling up some dinner is another item likely to find its way into said backpack on such expeditions. But why take up space with two separate items when one will do the job? That's where the Pack-Rifle comes in with its ability to covert from a rifle to a fishing rod.

Made by Utah-based Mountain View Machine & Welding, Inc., the Pack-Rifle is a lightweight, weather resistant, single shot, .22 caliber takedown rifle machined from high strength aluminum with a button rifled barrel consisting of a Cro-Moly liner and carbon fiber composite outer. Carbon fiber is also used for the rifle's butt stock tube and most of the unit's wear parts and fasteners are constructed of stainless steel.

Its makers claim the rifle's construction makes it the lightest rifle going around, weighing in at just 15.5 oz (439.4 g). They also say the Pack-Rifle can be broken down into two pieces without tools in less than two seconds, reducing its length from 33-inches (84 cm) to a more backpack-friendly 17 inches (43 cm). It can also be reassembled just as fast. When converting to a fishing rod, the barrel is removed and the butt stock tube extends to form the rod while a reel is attached to the handle.

The Pack-Rifle functioning as a fishing rod
The Pack-Rifle functioning as a fishing rod

The Pack-Rifle retails for US$425 and can also be fitted with optional adjustable peep sights, which cost extra. The company is also considering producing the Pack-Rifle in another caliber if the .22 caliber model is successful.

Source: The Firearm Blog

View gallery - 10 images
7 comments
Spike Elex
With this we can finally have an end to the classic \"the fish was this big\" stories!
Carlos Grados
Perfect gag gift idea for the outdoors type!
donwine
This could be a great product for a Saturday Night Live skit!
Timothy Sisson
Will it blend?
If you cant land the fish, and kill it with a .22 you should not be going after it with this device. And where do you stash the second .22 bullet.
Give me a Henry Arms AR-7 or Marlin Papoose and a Ronco pocket fisherman any day over this.
Gregg Eshelman
For some reason the theme songs for James Bond movies and The Man From U.N.C.L.E. run through my head after reading this article.
kellory
@Timothy, " Marlin Papoose and a Ronco pocket fisherman any day over this." Excellent choice! now, if only I could still buy the pocket fisherman.
william24
I know this is an old story, but despite at least one negative comment below from someone that seems to not get it, this is a good idea.
This isn't made for everyday hunting and fishing. This is made for unexpected survival, where you need to catch fish or hunt for small to medium game, and don't have the ability to carry a lot of gear. Such as when backpacking, where weight and size is limited. This combines the features of two items, saving weight and reducing bulk.
The ingenuity behind the is commendable. Yes, it's not ideal for every situation. But it amazes me that people can totally miss the point and criticize something like this.