Computers

Paper-Kit transforms 2D portraits into a 3D model

Paper-Kit transforms 2D portra...
Recreate yourself as a 3D paper model at Paper-Kit.com
Recreate yourself as a 3D paper model at Paper-Kit.com
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Recreate yourself as a 3D paper model at Paper-Kit.com
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Recreate yourself as a 3D paper model at Paper-Kit.com
You begin by uploading three photos of your head from different angles, which can be previewed and adjusted on the 3D model in real-time
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You begin by uploading three photos of your head from different angles, which can be previewed and adjusted on the 3D model in real-time
The software automatically flattens the model into chunks, which can be printed onto paper or card stock of your choosing
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The software automatically flattens the model into chunks, which can be printed onto paper or card stock of your choosing
Before exporting the file, you can adjust some parameters such as the number of polygons in the model
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Before exporting the file, you can adjust some parameters such as the number of polygons in the model
After printing, you'll have to meticulously cut out all the shapes
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After printing, you'll have to meticulously cut out all the shapes
This is what the average head will look like in separate pieces
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This is what the average head will look like in separate pieces
After cutting the parts out, you'll have to fold them along the dotted lines
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After cutting the parts out, you'll have to fold them along the dotted lines
Assembly requires glue and staples, and may require the use of tweezers to hold the pieces together
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Assembly requires glue and staples, and may require the use of tweezers to hold the pieces together
The completed paper model is hollow, so a big one could actually be worn on your head like a mask
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The completed paper model is hollow, so a big one could actually be worn on your head like a mask
A close-up of the completed paper face model
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A close-up of the completed paper face model
Another example of a paper face model
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Another example of a paper face model

Papercraft projects tend to be based on 3D models from video games or custom-made art projects. The basic idea is to take a 3D model and flatten it out in software such as Dunreeb Cutout or Pepakura Designer by Tama software. Then you print it, cut out the parts, fold them where necessary, and paste the whole mess together. Now, thanks to Paper-kit.com, if you've got a big head – or simply want one – you can use the same technique to build an over-sized three-dimensional paper model of yourself using 2D photos.

You begin by uploading photos taken from the front, left, and right side of your head. The software automatically maps that to a 3D polygonal model, which can be fine-tuned so that your eyes, nose, ears, and mouth match up. The software then flattens the model and generates a PDF file that costs US$2 dollars to download. This is then printed to make the model. Of course, if you have long hair it's probably not going to work for you, as the software currently has no way of handling extra details like ponytails.

The finished paper model wouldn't look out of place in an N64-era video game, but on the bright side fewer polygons (or sides of the model) require less work during assembly. And because the model is hollow, if you print out a really big version you can actually wear the thing on over of your real head and creep everyone out.

Alternatively, if you've got the skills to make and texture your own model then you can also upload that to the site, but chances are if you can do that you'll be able to use the available free papercraft software to skip the site's two dollar charge. You can see part of the build process and the finished results in the videos below. Happy crafting!

Source: Paper-Kit

Assembly

Assembling your paper kit

Completed head

My head

4 comments
Bob Ehresman
Can you say "carpool lane"?
BigGoofyGuy
It reminds me of what characters in earlier video games looked like or the first CGI was done for movies. I think it is cool. It seems like an inexpensive way to have a bust made of oneself. :)
slayerwulfe
2D ? is paper 2D i thought it was 3D and i also believed, (incorrectly ?) that anything that exist as entity was 3D.
Bill Coleman
Try fabric with iron on interfacing for a more durable end product. Could be crushed, and then restored with a shake.