Architecture

World's tallest hybrid timber tower planned for Canada

World's tallest hybrid timber ...
Canada's Earth Tower would meet the stringent Passive House green building certification standard that focuses on airtightness and insulation
Canada's Earth Tower would meet the stringent Passive House green building certification standard that focuses on airtightness and insulation
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Canada's Earth Tower would meet the stringent Passive House green building certification standard that focuses on airtightness and insulation
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Canada's Earth Tower would meet the stringent Passive House green building certification standard that focuses on airtightness and insulation
Canada's Earth Tower would consist of a podium and the tower itself
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Canada's Earth Tower would consist of a podium and the tower itself
Canada's Earth Tower would have a total floorspace of 40,000 sq ft (3,716 sq m )
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Canada's Earth Tower would have a total floorspace of 40,000 sq ft (3,716 sq m )
Canada's Earth Tower would include shared garden terraces
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Canada's Earth Tower would include shared garden terraces
Canada's Earth Tower's interior decor would make the most of the natural beauty of timber
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Canada's Earth Tower's interior decor would make the most of the natural beauty of timber
Canada's Earth Tower would include residential and office space
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Canada's Earth Tower would include residential and office space
Assuming it goes ahead, Canada's Earth Tower would reach up to 40 floors
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Assuming it goes ahead, Canada's Earth Tower would reach up to 40 floors
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As tall timber construction continues to grow in popularity, world's tallest records are being regularly broken. Perkins+Will recently unveiled a new and impressively sustainable hybrid timber building it has planned for Vancouver, Canada, that it says would be the tallest to date if built.

You'll note that Canada's Earth Tower, as it's named, is being billed as the world's tallest hybrid timber tower. That's because, like Brock Commons, it would contain a concrete core and not be made solely from wood, as Norway's 18 story 85.4 m (280 ft)-tall Mjøstårnet is. We've no word on the exact height of Canada's Earth Tower but it would certainly be taller than Mjøstårnet, reaching up to 40 floors.

Assuming it goes ahead, Canada's Earth Tower would reach up to 40 floors
Assuming it goes ahead, Canada's Earth Tower would reach up to 40 floors

Arguably just as impressive as Canada Earth Tower's potential height though is its sustainability. Beyond the obvious environmental benefits of using sustainably-sourced wood as a building material, Perkins+Will says it would meet the stringent Passive House green building certification standard that focuses on airtightness and insulation. It would also get at least some of its electricity from solar panels.

"The project will be Passive House certified, and will exceed the City of Vancouver's Zero Emissions Building Plan performance requirements, well ahead of the 2030 [reduction of carbon pollution] target," says Perkins+Will. "Aggressively reducing Green House Gas emissions, in construction and operations, is a priority for the project. As a part of the CaGBC (Canada Green Building Council) Zero Carbon Buildings Pilot program, Canada's Earth Tower will be a zero emissions building. The building will not consume fossil fuels, such as natural gas, in operation."

Canada's Earth Tower would include residential and office space
Canada's Earth Tower would include residential and office space

The renders depict an almost horseshoe-shaped podium, with the tower itself situated atop. Its interior would measure 40,000 sq ft (3,716 sq m ) and include office space and residential units, with shared south-facing winter garden terraces available to occupants. The interior design sensibly leaves the wood uncovered to highlight its natural beauty and both the tower itself and podium are topped by greenery.

It's not clear at this early stage whether or not Canada's Earth Tower will definitely go ahead, but we'll keep you posted.

Source: Perkins+Will

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1 comment
Nik
I doubt that the ''green building'' will match the effective ''green'' of the trees cut down to build it.