Pets

KittySpring fountain keeps your cat's water supply full and fresh

KittySpring fountain keeps you...
A couple of cats lap up some water from the KittySpring fountain
A couple of cats lap up some water from the KittySpring fountain
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KittySpring consists of a gravity-fed fountain that keeps the water supply fresh and avoids spillage and puddles
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KittySpring consists of a gravity-fed fountain that keeps the water supply fresh and avoids spillage and puddles
The KittySpring fountain was conceived to address a couple of problems its creators see with your traditional cat bowl
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The KittySpring fountain was conceived to address a couple of problems its creators see with your traditional cat bowl
The KittySpring fountain
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The KittySpring fountain
A couple of cats lap up some water from the KittySpring fountain
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A couple of cats lap up some water from the KittySpring fountain
The KittySpring is available via Kickstarter for early pledges of $35
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The KittySpring is available via Kickstarter for early pledges of $35
View gallery - 5 images

A simple bowl can certainly do the trick when it comes to providing your cat with water, but this bare bones approach does have its shortcomings. KittySpring is a more sophisticated solution for cat owners, consisting of a gravity-fed fountain that keeps the water supply fresh and avoids spillage and puddles.

The KittySpring fountain was conceived to address a couple of dilemmas its creators see with traditional cat bowls, in that they are prone to knocks and spillage, and that the water can become stale unless it is regularly replaced.

The KittySpring is available via Kickstarter for early pledges of $35
The KittySpring is available via Kickstarter for early pledges of $35

Their answer to these problems was to create a stable base for a wide, low-lying dish, hooked up to a tubular and transparent water tank that makes it easy to keep an eye on the levels inside. Gravity draws water from this tank and feeds it through a central bulb in the dish via a stainless steel filter, only topping it up when a thirsty cat begins to drain it.

This should mean that cat owners only need to refill the water tank every day or two, while the slow drip feed into the shallow dish below keeps the supply fresh and clean. All components are made from non-toxic pet-safe materials, and can be pulled apart for easy cleaning.

The KittySpring fountain was conceived to address a couple of problems its creators see with your traditional cat bowl
The KittySpring fountain was conceived to address a couple of problems its creators see with your traditional cat bowl

KittySpring is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign, where it has amassed more than US$400,000 in pledges at the time of writing. Early pledges of $35 are available and will put you in line for one of the fountains along with a non-slip pad for underneath, with shipping slated for October 2020 if all goes to plan.

You can check out the pitch video below.

The most cat-friendly water fountain on Earth | KittySpring

Source: Kickstarter

View gallery - 5 images
4 comments
Michael son of Lester
This looks like a very cool design but one thing I've learned from having two different pet fountains is how they lull a person into a sense of complacency. Before you know it, the fountain is being cleaned once a week then less and that's when things like mould and other nasty stuff crop up.

While this is a great idea for those who travel and are away for a day or two at a time, for the average stay home person I think it's better to stay with the simple steel bowl that gets cleaned and filled every day.
Trylon
I have an 8-cup stainless water bowl with a wide nonslip base that won't tip over. The cats don't drink much more than a cup a day. Inside it is a Drinkwell Hy-drate, basically a small submersible pump that circulates the water through an activated charcoal filter. I bought a reusable charcoal holder (unfortunately no longer available) so I wouldn't have to buy Drinkwell's rather expensive cartridges. The cats have filtered water at their disposal at all times rather than stagnant water, and the whole setup only cost me about $35-40.
UAVPilotMRG
Sorry, but any cat fountain that's not refillable from the top is a non-starter for me.
don1z
Forty years ago, I bought a watering station that consisted of a wide, shallow water dish with an attached bottle holder. The bottle holder supported a 2-liter soda bottle filled with water, inverted...as the cat drank from the bowl, water was replaced from the 2-liter reservoir. The design was almost identical to this 'invention'...it is nothing new.