Automotive

Peugeot Citroen says third-party tests confirm BlueHDi SCR tech for diesel emissions

Peugeot Citroen says third-par...
The system works by positioning the SCR upstream of the particulate filter
The system works by positioning the SCR upstream of the particulate filter
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Initial results from third-party testing of a new Blue HDi diesel exhaust system are encouraging for meeting Euro 6.2 emissions standards
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Initial results from third-party testing of a new Blue HDi diesel exhaust system are encouraging for meeting Euro 6.2 emissions standards
The system works by positioning the SCR upstream of the particulate filter
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The system works by positioning the SCR upstream of the particulate filter

Initial results of Peugeot 208 and 508 model testing by the French Ministry of Ecology, Sustainable Development and Energy comply with new regulations thanks to a change in the technology. The results, says Peugeot Citroen, confirm the effectiveness of the BlueHDi after-treatment system for diesel exhaust.

In the BlueHDi system, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology is positioned upstream of the particulate filter to eliminate up to 90 percent of the nitrogen (NOx) released by the diesel engine. This drops NOx emissions down to levels similar to gasoline engines, while maintaining the diesel engine advantage of lower CO2 emissions and greater fuel efficiency.

The Peugeot Citroen BlueHDi system has been implemented on select diesel-powered vehicles from the company since 2013. It has been gradually added as standard equipment on diesel models sold as Euro 6 compliant.

The SCR technology represents an investment of several hundred million euros and some 100 technology patents. This new testing confirms that the system conforms to 2017 Euro 6.2 standards (which begin in September 2017). There are three primary elements to the BlueHDi system includng an oxidation catalyst, SCR technology, and a diesel particulate filter.

The oxidation catalyst is mounted against the engine, converting unburned hydrocarbons (HC) and CO into water and CO2. The SCR converts NOx into water and nitrogen using AdBlue (a common urea treatment). Its change is its optimization of the tuning of the engine to favor consumption and specific performance. The diesel particulate filter then reduces 99.9 percent of the particulate number.

More test results are expected as the testing continues. The system is illustrated in the video below.

Source: PSA Peugeot Citroen
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7 comments
7 comments
Eddy
Hoping this more advanced system will stop the fault codes generation leading to diesel vehicles that are frequently only driven short distances from going in to limp home mode due to blocked particulate filters.
Gavin Roe
does this mean we will no more diesels spewing out black smoke, stinking up the place
hkmk23
This is so old technology....my 95 Touareg V10 has Adblue and a particulate filter from new.
pmshah
@hkmk23
What you claim is true and good then why did Volkswagen have to doctor the computer system in the first place?
Aaron Turpen
hkmk23: This is a different way of using existing technology and it's more efficient.
pmshah: VW gamed the system because the system was easy to game. They gained a leadership role in diesel vehicles thanks to that. Others don't seem to have followed suit because they were not in a position to weather the eventual storm that would come when the manipulation of the system came to light.
GordJames
STOP. This is NOT a fix Ad Blue devices are easily defeated by cheap electronic devices that bypass the engine controls that prevent the engine from being started if there is no Ad Blue in the reservoir. These bypass (defeat) are readily available and cheaper than buying Ad Blue.
YuraG
does anyone think that cutting the vehicle's use to the minimum and keeping the car in a good shape is greener and cheaper than getting hooked up on another cheap printer (which is not cheap in this case) with expensive cartridges? they'd better use this blue thing on tankers and containerships