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HotDive turns smartphones into dive computers – and underwater cameras

HotDive turns smartphones into...
The HotDive housing is presently on Kickstarter
The HotDive housing is presently on Kickstarter
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The HotDive housing is presently on Kickstarter
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The HotDive housing is presently on Kickstarter
The HotDive is watertight down to 80 m (262 ft)
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The HotDive is watertight down to 80 m (262 ft)
The HotDive app's display
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The HotDive app's display
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There are already devices that allow smartphones to double either as dive computers, or as underwater cameras. The currently crowdfunding HotDive, however, does both.

Constructed from a single piece of aluminum alloy – and 6-mm transparent polycarbonate – the HotDive housing reportedly works with any smartphone no larger than 164 by 84 mm (6.45 by 3.3 in), and is watertight down to a depth of 80 m (262 ft). An integrated pump system creates a vacuum inside, once the housing is sealed up.

The HotDive also features an 800-lumen LED spotlight with a daylight-like color temperature of 5,800 to 6,500 Kelvin; a Swiss TE MS5083 depth sensor; an integrated electronic compass; and a microprocessor.

Data from the latter three items is transmitted via Bluetooth to an iOS/Android app on the smartphone, which allows users to perform functions such as monitoring their current depth, checking their heading, and calculating their ascent time. Both audible and haptic warnings can be programmed to sound when divers reach their maximum desired depth, when they need to start wrapping up the dive, and if they're ascending too quickly.

Additionally, data from each dive automatically gets recorded on a dive log within the app.

The HotDive is watertight down to 80 m (262 ft)
The HotDive is watertight down to 80 m (262 ft)

Users access the app functions (and switch the spotlight on and off) utilizing a column of pushbuttons on the rear right-hand side of the housing – these buttons are wirelessly linked to the phone. A separate wireless shutter switch is used to snap photos or record videos. The smartphone's camera looks out of a clear panel in front, aided by the light in dim conditions.

And while the phone is powered by its own battery, all of the housing's electronics are powered by an onboard 3,500-mAh lithium battery. One charge should reportedly be good for about 100 minutes of use when utilizing the spotlight, or 15 to 20 days if the light isn't used.

Should you be interested, the HotDive is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign. A pledge of US$179 will get you one, when and if they reach production – the planned retail price is $349. The device can be seen in use, in the video below.

Source: Kickstarter

HotDive: Turn your phone into an all-in-one smart diving kit

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2 comments
Altronix
Creating a vacuum inside this device seems counter-intuitive. Surely pressurizing would help keep water out. A vacuum means that water seals need to be so much better.
Tan Axel
A vacuum system will create stronger sealing. Sometime even stronger than mechanical sealing.

As you descend , the pressure become higher. A strong body is needed. Pressurizing will reduce the seal integrity.

Imagine the dive mask. Suck in hard. Under vacuum, thr dealing is so tight that it creates squeezing ... if you blow air from your nose, the seal soften. Even under 30M.

Also under vacuum, fogging is being controlled.