Architecture

The ambitious plan to build a city of floating pyramids

Wayaland would include houses, hotels, retail areas, and cinemas
Wayaland would include houses, hotels, retail areas, and cinemas
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Pierpaolo Lazzarini, the Italian designer behind the UFO 2.0 floating home, has unveiled another futuristic floating housing concept
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Pierpaolo Lazzarini, the Italian designer behind the UFO 2.0 floating home, has unveiled another futuristic floating housing concept
If built, Wayaland would consist of multiple floating pyramid-shaped modules called Waya, each one with different functions
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If built, Wayaland would consist of multiple floating pyramid-shaped modules called Waya, each one with different functions
Wayaland would include houses, hotels, retail areas, and cinemas
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Wayaland would include houses, hotels, retail areas, and cinemas
Wayaland's pyramid-shaped structures would be made from fiberglass, carbon and steel
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Wayaland's pyramid-shaped structures would be made from fiberglass, carbon and steel
The Waya modules  would get all power from solar panels and water turbines
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The Waya modules  would get all power from solar panels and water turbines
The Waya modules would sit upon large floating basements
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The Waya modules would sit upon large floating basements
Inside a Waya greenhouse
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Inside a Waya greenhouse
A Waya greenhouse
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A Waya greenhouse
A Waya housing unit with underwater bedroom
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A Waya housing unit with underwater bedroom
Some Waya modules would have a mooring area for small water craft
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Some Waya modules would have a mooring area for small water craft
Waya modules would serve as houses, others might be communal pools, hotels, retail, and entertainment spaces, for example
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Waya modules would serve as houses, others might be communal pools, hotels, retail, and entertainment spaces, for example
Wayaland's pyramid-shaped structures would be made from fiberglass, carbon and steel
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Wayaland's pyramid-shaped structures would be made from fiberglass, carbon and steel
Wayaland's modules would get all power from solar panels and water turbines
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Wayaland's modules would get all power from solar panels and water turbines
Lazzarini plans to try and make Wayaland real with his own private crowdfunding campaign
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Lazzarini plans to try and make Wayaland real with his own private crowdfunding campaign
The designer estimates that to build the first Waya module he will need to raise €350,000 (about US$422,600)
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The designer estimates that to build the first Waya module he will need to raise €350,000 (about US$422,600)
If built, Wayaland would consist of multiple floating pyramids, each one with different functions
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If built, Wayaland would consist of multiple floating pyramids, each one with different functions

Pierpaolo Lazzarini, the Italian designer behind the UFO 2.0 floating home, has conceived a floating community made up of solar-powered pyramid-shaped buildings. The Wayaland project is still very much in the concept stage at present, but Lazzarini is hoping to raise the funds necessary to begin construction on it with a crowdfunding campaign.

Wayaland would consist of a group of pyramid-shaped floating buildings called Waya that are inspired by Mayan and Japanese architecture. They would come in different sizes and serve different purposes, so some may function as homes, while others could be used as greenhouses, hotels, and cinemas, for example. The largest would rise to a maximum 30 m (98 ft) tall, above the water line.

The Waya modules would be constructed from fiberglass, carbon fiber, and steel, and set atop large floating platforms with basements suitable for use as optional underwater bedrooms. The structures would be moved with motors and include a small marina for boats and other water craft to moor. Each would receive electricity from rooftop solar panel arrays and water turbines.

A Waya housing unit with underwater bedroom
A Waya housing unit with underwater bedroom

This feels like one of those projects that's only meant as food-for-thought, but Lazzarini is definitely trying to make it happen. He says that to build the first (and smallest) Waya module he will need €350,000 (about US$422,600).

To raise the money, he's planning to launch a crowdfunding campaign and offer people a stay in the module for the cost of €1,000 ($1,200) per night. Other promised benefits include a vote on where Wayaland would be located from a pre-selected list of suitable locations, as well as an invitation to a planned 2022 inauguration.

Check out the video below to see a little more of Wayaland.

Source: Lazzarini Design

WAYA

6 comments
ArnaudDemuyt
There's some obvious design flaws with this. How would pumping work, such as bathroom and the such. It would need to stay close to the mainland or things like garbage would start piling up quickly. This is also something I would see only really working for the super rich, and definitely not for large populations as moving around looks to be a huge hassle with having to move everywhere on a boat. Had the pyramids been able to attach to each other, it would honestly be a lot better. Also privacy seems to not exist as anyone can look into your bedroom while you're asleep.
guzmanchinky
How is sewage handled?
christopher
@guzmanchinky - how is all coastal sewage handled already?
Douglas Bennett Rogers
This is a good start for a pelagic farming community. The ecology of the community should insert seamlessly into the ocean ecology. Hydrogen would probably be the first export.
Wolf0579
Storms? Increasing frequency of cat 5 hurricanes might make this a very risky idea.
RocoWolfe
Does no one on this website think the professionals have already met with other professionals to deal with these problems? I mean, new cars come out often but no one wonders if it will come with some sort of engine or motor to move with. Why should you be concerned about sewage and garbage? If this is to be a luxury establishment, those won"t be a problem. Again, that's like asking how yachts handle sewage and garbage.