Electronics

Luxor 2 flashlight automatically detects targets, adjusts beam for ideal illumination

Luxor 2 flashlight automatical...
The Luxor 2 flashlight is designed to automatically adapt lighting based on where its being aimed
The Luxor 2 flashlight is designed to automatically adapt lighting based on where its being aimed
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The Luxor 2 packs a 5,000 mAh battery that charges through its micro USB port
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The Luxor 2 packs a 5,000 mAh battery that charges through its micro USB port
The Luxor 2 features digital focusing that's enabled by turning your wrist
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The Luxor 2 features digital focusing that's enabled by turning your wrist
The Luxor 2 flashlight is designed to automatically adapt lighting based on where its being aimed
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The Luxor 2 flashlight is designed to automatically adapt lighting based on where its being aimed
The Luxor 2 can function as a torch light when held or set on a flat surface
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The Luxor 2 can function as a torch light when held or set on a flat surface
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Although most modern flashlights provide the means to adjust beam focus and brightness, very few are equally effective at both flood- and spot-lighting. You could own one of each flashlight type, but the latest from PLX Devices takes a different approach. Not only is the Luxor 2 designed for optimal light delivery, it does so automatically by detecting where it's being pointed in order to adjust the beam accordingly.

The Luxor 2 Adaptive Digital Focusing Flashlight packs seven Cree LEDs that provide up to 850 lumens of combined light output. These LEDs are controlled by proprietary circuitry, powered by a 5,000-mAh lithium-polymer battery that recharges through a micro USB port. Battery packs can be swapped out, each of which should last up to 65 hours at 100 lumens of output per full charge.

But what makes the PLX Devices Luxor 2 flashlight unique is how the adaptive focus mode is designed to work with the built-in 3-axis accelerometer. Similar to sensors in most modern smartphones, the hardware within the Luxor 2 carefully monitors movement and orientation.

So if a user points the Luxor 2 at the ground while walking, the LEDs provide flood illumination. Bring the end up to a level position, and it automatically switches to a wider beam for greater peripheral awareness. Aim at an object in the distance, and the flashlight throws a narrow beam of light. And by holding the Luxor 2 vertically and/or setting it on a flat surface, the LEDs will illuminate areas like a lantern.

The Luxor 2 can function as a torch light when held or set on a flat surface
The Luxor 2 can function as a torch light when held or set on a flat surface

In addition to adaptive focus are manual and digital modes, which are selected via the integrated push buttons. These provide the user with standard presets as well as the ability to smoothly adjust the focus of light with a simple turn of the wrist. Embedded within the Luxor 2 flashlight's aluminum body is a high-contrast OLED screen that displays key metrics such as light output, remaining battery life, time to discharge, throw distance, and more. Those concerned about longevity will be pleased to know that the Luxor 2 is designed to be waterproof and drop resistant.

The PLX Devices Luxor 2 Adaptive Digital Focusing Flashlight is currently funding on Kickstarter as the designers' sixth product campaign, having raised 300 percent of its US$25,000 goal in just a day. A pledge of $79 gets you one Luxor 2 (with rechargeable battery), saving $70 off the planned retail price of $149.

If the manufacturing and assembly go according to schedule, backers can expect shipments of the Luxor 2 to start sometime March, 2016.

Check out the video below to see an overview of features, including how the adaptive digital focusing works.

Source: Kickstarter

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1 comment
1 comment
Shadetree Engineer
I've got a flashlight like this one. A Nitecore Sens AA that I picked up off the ebay for $12. The Sens AA has an accellerometer built in, just like this Luxor design. The Sens is a twisty type light. You have to twist the lens end all the way down to turn it on. If it's aimed straight up when turned on, it goes into auto mode where it changes output depending on the downwards tilt you hold it at. Holding it flat horizontal while turning on will put it into full output fixed mode while holding it aimed down will turn it on in low mode fixed. In automatic mode, it gets annoying because the sensors can't tell the difference between sideways motion and tilting motion. So it's always changing output levels when you don't want it to. I never use the auto mode now, it's not worth the hassle. It just seems like a malfunctioning light when I do that. But, it runs on a single AA battery with a boost drive built in, so it can go down to 0.3 volts. That's a really nice feature for a backup light. Basically I can use the batteries that my GPS can't continue running on to get full power light with this little flashlight. It puts out 240 lumens on a dead battery! Twice now, it was the only light I had on a dayhike in the woods that ran well after dark, and it lit the trail up just perfectly. I think a dead nbattery goes about 4 hours straight. So, bottom line - this auto tilt thing needs some extra consideration, but a boost drive is worth looking into.