Architecture

TallerDE2 Arquitectos reinvents the bachelor pad

TallerDE2 Arquitectos reinvent...
Construction on Pop-Up House began in March 2013, and was completed in May 2014 (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
Construction on Pop-Up House began in March 2013, and was completed in May 2014 (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
View 10 Images
Construction on Pop-Up House began in March 2013, and was completed in May 2014 (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
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Construction on Pop-Up House began in March 2013, and was completed in May 2014 (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
TallerDE2 Arquitectos reports that its efforts resulted in the apartment gaining an additional 27 percent of usable floorspace (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
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TallerDE2 Arquitectos reports that its efforts resulted in the apartment gaining an additional 27 percent of usable floorspace (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
The apartment measures 68.5 sq m (737 sq ft) in total (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
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The apartment measures 68.5 sq m (737 sq ft) in total (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
The sleeping area (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
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The sleeping area (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
The lounge area (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
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The lounge area (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
The bachelor pad is now better suited to enable the client to pursue his interests (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
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The bachelor pad is now better suited to enable the client to pursue his interests (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
The basic idea behind the project is to more adequately meet the needs of a thirty-something bachelor than a typical apartment might (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
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The basic idea behind the project is to more adequately meet the needs of a thirty-something bachelor than a typical apartment might (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
TallerDE2 Arquitectos installed a total of 54 modular units that each serves a specific purpose (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
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TallerDE2 Arquitectos installed a total of 54 modular units that each serves a specific purpose (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
The bathroom has been split into multiple small parts (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
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The bathroom has been split into multiple small parts (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
The wardrobe and desk area (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
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The wardrobe and desk area (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
View gallery - 10 images

Following the Madrid-based Didomestic and All I Own House comes yet another example of modular living in Spain's capital that features a utilitarian decor and unusual space-saving furniture. The Pop-Up House, by TallerDE2 Arquitectos, involved the renovation of a mid-20th Century apartment into a novel bachelor pad.

Work on the Pop-Up House began in March 2013, and was completed in May 2014. The basic concept behind the project is to better meet the needs of a thirty-something bachelor than a typical apartment could – and free-up some space in the process. This was tackled by removing practically all of the apartment's original interior, including much of the original fittings, fixtures, and even the interior dividing walls.

TallerDE2 Arquitectos installed a total of 54 modular units that each serves a specific purpose (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )
TallerDE2 Arquitectos installed a total of 54 modular units that each serves a specific purpose (Photo: Miguel de Guzmán )

In the shell that remained, TallerDE2 Arquitectos installed a total of 54 modular units inspired by a set of traveling trunks. Each unit serves a particular purpose, and instead of a standard bathroom, for example, the apartment features a small toilet and shower, while a separate freestanding unit contains a sink and mirror.

Various other units and pieces of fold-down furniture are dotted around the apartment which unfold to reveal cupboards, wardrobes, and hidden appliances, including a microwave and large television. While not for everyone, the lack of painted or papered finish on the modular units certainly creates a distinctive interior design.

TallerDE2 Arquitectos reports that its dramatic redesign resulted in the apartment gaining an additional 27 percent of usable floorspace, and it measures a total of 68.5 sq m (737 sq ft).

The video below shows the apartment's space-saving furniture and layout in further detail.

Source: TallerDE2 Arquitectos

The Pop Up House by TALLERDE2 Architects

View gallery - 10 images
3 comments
Jeff Rosati
That's a lot of exposed OSB. I guess bachelors love the smell of formaldehyde resin off gassing.
Jon Smith
"While not for everyone", point your finger squarely at me. Looks exactly like the basement storage spaces in my condo complex which are damp and moldy. Ya no thanks.
kmccune
Nice,but smelly.