Bicycles

New device lets cyclists give manual shifting the gears

New device lets cyclists give ...
ProShift on display at Interbike, hooked up to a Shimano Di2 system
ProShift on display at Interbike, hooked up to a Shimano Di2 system
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ProShift on display at Interbike, hooked up to a Shimano Di2 system
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ProShift on display at Interbike, hooked up to a Shimano Di2 system

Electronic gear-shifting systems for bikes already make life easier for cyclists by consistently delivering crisp precise shifts, plus they don't need to be adjusted to compensate for stretched cables. Texas-based Baron Controls, however, is out to make things even easier. Its new ProShift device works with existing electronic shifting systems, automatically taking care of the shifting for the rider.

Communicating wirelessly with third-party sensors such as power meters and heart rate monitors, the handlebar-mounted ProShift determines when to shift gears based on parameters including speed, cadence, heart rate and power. It can be set up to prioritize its shifts based on any one of those (i.e: to makes shifts primarily to maintain a given heart rate), depending on user preferences.

Additionally, if riders wish to temporarily pedal a bit faster, etc, they can just switch the device to manual control.

According to the rep we spoke to at the Interbike show in Las Vegas, ProShift works with existing electronic shifting systems from Shimano, Campagnolo and SRAM. One charge of its battery should reportedly be good for over 50 hours of use.

It's available now, priced at US$799.

Source: ProShift

2 comments
StWils
Just exactly hoe the hell hard is it to just push, pull, or otherwise move a little lever? This worthless product could only marginally be just a little bit more worthless if it also sent snapchats or short messages to a rider's smartphone to advise them of the current or projected gear in use on the bike the Pinhead owner is currently riding.
habakak
Electronic shifting is great. But automatic shifting is not something I can imagine would work on specifically mountain bikes. That is one area where I like to maintain control. Shifting under load is the issue that needs to be resolved. The cassette and derailleur model unfortunately does not lend itself to that from what I know. Internal drivetrains are in no rush to go mainstream, so I hope this is the next big improvement coming in biking. However I have no reason to believe it is and see many other things taking priority over that development in the next decade.