Outdoors

RainBender umbrella thwarts post-rain puddles

RainBender umbrella thwarts po...
The RainBender inverts the conventional umbrella design
The RainBender inverts the conventional umbrella design
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The RainBender secures with a shoulder stap
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The RainBender secures with a shoulder stap
The RainBender prototype
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The RainBender prototype
The RainBender inverts the conventional umbrella design
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The RainBender inverts the conventional umbrella design
The RainBender uses a carbon fiber cylinder
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The RainBender uses a carbon fiber cylinder
The RainBender strap doubles as a luggage strap
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The RainBender strap doubles as a luggage strap
The RainBender in action
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The RainBender in action
The RainBender being used in a car
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The RainBender being used in a car
The RainBender design detail
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The RainBender design detail
The RainBender uses flexible canopy ribs
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The RainBender uses flexible canopy ribs
View gallery - 9 images

Umbrellas may be a handy thing to have in a downpour, but opening and closing one is often tricky and coming in out of the rain raises the question of what to do with a soggy bumbershoot. The RainBender umbrella tackles this age old problem with an inside-out design where instead of folding, the canopy vanishes inside its own handle.

One reason why many an entry hall is populated with dripping umbrellas on a rainy day is because the conventional design doesn't leave any place for a used brolly to drain except on the floor. This makes not only lobbies, but also cars, lifts, and other areas vulnerable to a minor secondary deluge.

RainBender avoids this problem by replacing the rigid canopy frame of conventional umbrellas with flexible ribs attached to central pole. This pole sits inside of a lightweight carbon fiber cylinder that forms a thicker than usual handle. Instead of folding, sliding a ring down pulls the canopy inside the cylinder, which becomes a receptacle for dripping rainwater that would otherwise end up on the carpet or the head of an unlucky driver trying to get into the car.

The RainBender prototype
The RainBender prototype

When convenient, the RainBender cylinder can be drained and the umbrella opened up to dry. It secures with an adjustable shoulder strap that also doubles as a luggage strap that fits over a carry-on handle.

The RainBender is the focus of a Kickstarter campaign running through January 3, 2016 and is available in Noble Black or Nova Red at a pledge-reward early bird price of US$50 for the first 200.

The video below introduces the RainBender.

Source: RainBender

RainBender Umbrella - Contains the Rain, So You Stay Dry!

View gallery - 9 images
3 comments
Martin-tu
In black, I foresee a rather big potential downside; Collapsed, -or folded- it looks slightly similar to a Rocket Propelled Grenade launcher. (Maybe if it was in pink or white).
W8post
Do you see yourself running through the airport with that umbrella thing strapped across your carry-on? NO? Others will! [and feel...] and-uh Martin, what's wrong with ANY Scottish tartan design?
Bob Flint
As I mentioned in the April 27th comment inside-out design this thing does keep most of the wetness inside, so at your forgetful leisure moment to drain it can and will get moldy. Furthermore, it is not completely sealed, in slide 8 of 9 one can clearly see a slit running along the tube length, most likely a second or possibly a third along the length of the tube(a structural connection to the inner components. Enough rain water collects inside it will find it's way out and unless you turn your slotted tube upside down your get water leaking out of those slots probably down your forearm as you are trying to stay dry next time you forget to empty it. The tube could be transparent or even clear but the sliding action would scratch the surface and the thought of wet moldy material less visually appealing.