Health & Wellbeing

Robo-Washer Revolution cleans and dries hands, then recycles its water after each use

Boldly named the Robo-Washer Revolution, the new and improved machine features a much more refined design
Boldly named the Robo-Washer Revolution, the new and improved machine features a much more refined design
View 3 Images
The inventor hopes that the recycling technology inside the Robo-Wash Revolution will also find applications in dishwashers, washing machines, showers and drinking fountains
1/3
The inventor hopes that the recycling technology inside the Robo-Wash Revolution will also find applications in dishwashers, washing machines, showers and drinking fountains
The new Robo-Washer does away with soap entirely and washes hands using a cup of antibacterial water instead
2/3
The new Robo-Washer does away with soap entirely and washes hands using a cup of antibacterial water instead
Boldly named the Robo-Washer Revolution, the new and improved machine features a much more refined design
3/3
Boldly named the Robo-Washer Revolution, the new and improved machine features a much more refined design

We got a glimpse of what future bathroom hygiene might entail last year, when inventor Donal Vitez took the wraps off his all-in-one handwashing and drying device. The prototype for the Robo-Washer was certainly rough around the edges, but the notion of plunging your mitts into some kind of one-stop hand sanitizing wonder machine was enough to catch our attention. Now Vitez is back with a revised Robo-Washer, which like its predecessor handles washing and drying affairs from beginning to end, but then recycles what little water it uses after each cycle.

The first iteration of the Robo-Washer appeared as a tall wooden crate with a stainless steel doggy bowl-shaped opening on top. Placing your hands in the bowl and rubbing them together saw them sprayed with high pressure soap water from all angles, before it then continued onto the drying cycle. The first version used around one cup of water per use, which was then drained after use.

Boldly named the Robo-Washer Revolution, the new and improved machine features a much more refined design, with a uniform stainless steel body from top to bottom. But that's not the most impressive upgrade. It does away with soap entirely and washes hands using a cup of antibacterial water instead. After each use, the unit filters and disinfects this very same water for the next set of grubby paws to be cleansed in, resulting in what Vitez claims to be hospital-grade hygiene.

Thus this company's noble quest has shifted from offering a convenient and contact-free way to prepare your hands for post-bathroom use, to addressing water wastage. Vitez claims that a conventional sink has at least 17 gallons (65 l) dribble down its drain each day never to be seen again, but this is just the beginning. He hopes that the recycling technology inside the Robo-Wash Revolution will also find applications in dishwashers, washing machines, showers and drinking fountains. Which is promising, because we're not entirely convinced everyone would be boarding this water recycling ship if it was purely anchored in the bacteria-filled waters of public restrooms.

Vitez won't reveal how much each unit will cost, but does say that it will pay for itself in as little as one year as a result of the soap saved.

You can see the Robo-Washer Revolution in use in the video below.

Source: Robo-Washer

Maker Faire 2015 NY: World's First Water Recycling Hand Washer-Dryer

4 comments
Stephen N Russell
For events IE County Fairs, rodeos, concerts & for 3rd world: Africa, India, SE Asia, So America.
Bob Flint
What the hell is that annoying sound track!! Looks like a large bedpan with led lights around the rim, uses both water, & electricity, and then why the towels to dry/wipe of residue? Spit on your hands, and wipe on the ground about as effective. This is suppose to be progress from what hand wipes, & cleansing gels? Major fail...
DomainRider
The 'Drying Cycle' appears to be a paper towel. So this thing basically recycles soapy water...
Donald Vitez
Team Robo-Washer was concentrating on the Revolution's ability to recycle the water it uses in preparation for its unveiling at World Maker Faire NY. We were in a race against time. The Revolution does not recycle soapy water. No soap is needed. The device accepts ordinary tap water or contaminated water from a river if you like, and produces its own antimicrobial water that is continuously filtered and disinfected. In laboratory tests we even cycled water mixed with transmission fluid and produced drinking water within 20 seconds The drying aspect of the device is trivial, as there are several methods to accomplish the drying task. The water that is produced leaves your hands cleaner than a hospital operating room. Ebola, MRSA and Staff are no match for the Revolution. Team Robo-Washer is working hard to perfect the device and it will not be released for sale until it has been thoroughly tested and proven extremely reliable.