Robotics

Talking, moving humanoid robot simulates a patient with a brain injury

Talking, moving humanoid robot...
The HAL S5301 robot should be on the market this spring (Northern Hemisphere)
The HAL S5301 robot should be on the market this spring (Northern Hemisphere)
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The HAL S5301's vital signs can be monitored using standard equipment
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The HAL S5301's vital signs can be monitored using standard equipment
The HAL S5301 robot should be on the market this spring (Northern Hemisphere)
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The HAL S5301 robot should be on the market this spring (Northern Hemisphere)
The HAL S5301 is reportedly capable of engaging in two-way conversational speech with students
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The HAL S5301 is reportedly capable of engaging in two-way conversational speech with students
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In order to train their students, medical schools often get actors to present symptoms of certain conditions. Offering what is claimed to be a more consistent and readily available alternative, the HAL S5301 robot is designed to simulate a brain-injured patient.

Manufactured by Miami-based company Gaumard Scientific, the S5301 is a life-sizeTa
adult humanoid robot which is programmed to mimic the symptoms of stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). It does so in three ways.

First of all, the robot is reportedly capable of engaging in two-way conversational speech with students.

It will verbally respond to their queries, not only describing its symptoms but also speaking in a manner similar to that of a brain-injured individual. Utilizing AI-based algorithms, it's additionally said to "get smarter over time," honing its conversational skills with each use.

Secondly, the S5301's head, arm and hand movements – including its motor reflexes – are said to be similar to those of someone who has suffered a stroke or TBI. Its face, for instance, will droop like that of a stroke victim.

The HAL S5301's vital signs can be monitored using standard equipment
The HAL S5301's vital signs can be monitored using standard equipment

Finally, its body presents cardiac, respiratory and vascular characteristics which are in line with those of a real-life brain injury patient. These can be measured and monitored utilizing standard diagnostic devices, plus they will respond to the use of equipment such as defibrillators and mechanical ventilators.

The HAL S5301 robot was unveiled last month in Los Angeles, at the International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare. It should be commercially available this spring (Northern Hemisphere). Prospective buyers can register for updates via the company website.

Source: Gaumard Scientific

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3 comments
3 comments
windykites
Does it lie there, unconscious? (lol) These robots must cost a fortune. Surely actors can play the part more cost effectively?
Gabe Ets-Hokin
They had to name it HAL? Really? All the other robot names were taken?
EH
Better name: Dain Brammage